Monthly Archives: March 2007

Photography Business: Find a Photo Gallery

In my post titled Build a Photography Business in 24 Hours, I mentioned that I would expand on each piece of the puzzle for creating your own business. I’m using my recent experience with setting up Auer Photoworks as the basis for this guide. Here are all the pieces of the business-puzzle I talked about (with the * items being optional):

  1. Photographs
  2. Gallery Software
  3. Hosting Company
  4. Domain Name
  5. Trade Name
  6. Bank
  7. $500
  8. * Merchant Account
  9. * Accounting
  10. * Marketing

This post will focus on step 2 of the critical items: Gallery Software. Your gallery software is your interface to the world. This is what you will use to display your work and communicate with potential customers. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, but it should be professional, clean, and easy to navigate and operate.

If you feel like you need to design your own site from the ground up, more power to ya. If not, there are many options out there for photo galleries. Some are free, some cost a lot of money. Do your homework and check around. Find one that looks clean, is easy to use (for both site management and site navigation), and has a shopping cart built into it. Most of the bigger gallery software providers have a place where you can demo the storefront and the management interface. Here are a few of the galleries I came across when doing my research:

I ended up purchasing the KTools Photo Store because of its good balance between built in features and price. The software is easy to customize and you can upload and organize your photos quickly from the web browser or via FTP. It has very clean interfaces and it’s intuitive to use. The software also gives you the option to sell digital files and/or prints, so you have a fair amount of flexibility to what you can offer your customers. The shopping cart is integrated into the software and it has built in capability to offer customers checkout options of checks, PayPal, and Credit Cards — you just need a PayPal account, 2CheckOut account, or Plug ‘n Pay account. The software also tracks orders and automatically sends email to you and the customer. The whole thing is written in PHP and utilizes a MySQL database, so the code is easy to modify if you know a little PHP.

If you don’t want to spend any money and you know more than a little PHP, take a look at the Gallery package. I use it for my family web album and it’s pretty darn good. You’ll have to integrate your own shopping cart and checkout options for selling, but everything else is basically done for you. The software has a huge community following with lots of support and software add-ons from other users.

Whatever you do, pick your software carefully. Make sure you’re happy with it, and it does what you need it to. Tomorrow, I’ll be talking about web hosting companies so you have somewhere to put your new software.

Photo of the Day…

The Tower of Brussels

Photo by Brian Auer
03/07/07 Brussels, Belgium
The Tower of Brussels
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
42mm equiv * f/4 * 1/10s * ISO1600

Photography Business: Get Your Stock in Order

In my post titled Build a Photography Business in 24 Hours, I mentioned that I would expand on each piece of the puzzle for creating your own business. I’m using my recent experience with setting up Auer Photoworks as the basis for this guide. Here are all the pieces of the business-puzzle I talked about (with the * items being optional):

  1. Photographs
  2. Gallery Software
  3. Hosting Company
  4. Domain Name
  5. Trade Name
  6. Bank
  7. $500
  8. * Merchant Account
  9. * Accounting
  10. * Marketing

This post will focus on step 1 of the critical items: Photographs. Of course, if you’re going to start a photography business you should have photos. You don’t need to have hundreds of photos, but 30 or 40 good ones will get you going. Plus you can always add to your collection later.

But it’s not enough to just have some good photos that you think you’d like to sell. The photos need to be in their absolute best condition, fully edited and ready for show. If you’re really serious about your work, you’ll learn to do your own editing using software like Photoshop. This will give you full artistic control over your photos, rather than relying on automatic adjustments made by lower-end software. I’m not harping on anybody who doesn’t use Photoshop, I’m just saying that these types of tools give you more control.

Another photo related item to address is organization. The whole point of organizing is to give you quick access to your work in a structured manner. This will keep you from wasting time, losing photos, or making other mistakes while working with your files. There are hundreds of ways to organize your photos within the file structure and within organizing software. I can’t possibly cover all of them, but I’ll throw out a couple of tips that I generally follow.

In the file structure, I’ve got one folder for all my photos. Within that folder, I have a folder for each year (2002, 2003, 2004, …YYYY). Within those folders, I have a dated folder (in the format of MMDD) for each time I unloaded the camera rather than for each month. I did this so I could separate between photo shoots and keep similar items together. Plus, the folder names naturally organize themselves in a chronological order.

In my organization software (Picasa), I place a star on the photos I like so I can pick them out easily later. I also have an album for each main category of photos that I use to link to finished photos. This keeps my saleable stock in all in one place without duplicating files (it’s all done with links in the software). I’ve also got an album for photos that I need to process, and one for those I’m in the middle of processing. That way I don’t forget what I was doing if I take a break for a week or so. Once I edit a new photo, I’ll just move it from the processing albums into the finished photo albums.

The other thing I use Picasa for is keywording. It’s a painful and time consuming activity, but it’s worth it. As soon as I unload my camera, I’ll weed out the real trash, I’ll quickly glance through them and place stars on the stuff I kind of like, then I’ll do a first coat of keywording (5 to 10 keywords). The keywords will include the location of the photo plus the basic descriptive words that tell me what’s in the photo. This will help you find old photos very very easily. Once a photo is chosen to go into the “good” albums (fully edited), I’ll go back and super-keyword the photo. I’ll keyword it for visible colors, emotions, moods, physical details, descriptors, and any word that pops into my head when I look at that photo. I’ll usually end up with 30 to 50 keywords.

Organizing, editing, and keywording your photos is important when you’re preparing to start your photography business. Doing these things will save you much more time when you’re trying to upload, categorize, and keyword them in your online gallery. Most galleries will even pick out the embedded keywords, thus saving even more time. If you’re already organized, you’re ahead of the game — it can be a real time-sink when getting ready to launch a business.

Tomorrow I’ll talk about finding online gallery software that you can use as your main interface with customers. Stay tuned!

Photo of the Day…

Fonky Jazz Graffiti

Photo by Brian Auer
03/05/07 Neuchatel, Switzerland
Fonky Jazz Graffiti
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
75mm equiv * f/4.5 * 1/30s * ISO100

Build a Photography Business in 24 Hours

Ever consider setting up shop and selling your photos? What’s holding you back? Maybe you think it will take too much time, too much effort, too much money, or maybe you just don’t know where to start. Well, I’m here to tell you, it’s not hard, or expensive — and I’ll show you how. I’m talking about establishing yourself as a real business, ready to sell photos and take money through an online storefront.

I’ve been putting it off for some time now, but I finally bit the bullet and did it. You can see my new photo gallery at Auer PhotoWorks. It took me more than one day to do it, but if you were determined it wouldn’t be impossible. Most of your time spent will be doing research on the various aspects of the business. The actual establishment of your business is pretty straight forward and a lot of things can be done in parallel.

I’ll give you the recipe for starting your own photography business, and here are your main ingredients:

  1. Photographs
  2. Gallery Software
  3. Hosting Company
  4. Domain Name
  5. Trade Name
  6. Bank
  7. $500

Optional (suggested) items:

  1. Merchant Account
  2. Accounting
  3. Marketing

Over the next several days, I’ll take an in-depth look at each of these items in order to give you a better understanding of what is needed. Each post will contain the resources you’ll need to get started on that particular item in the lists above. I considered writing it all into one post, but it turned out way too big — so I’ll string it out.

If you’ve got your thoughts together on this and you’re determined to do it, you could probably pull it off in one day. I took my time and stretched it out over a week, but I like to do a lot of research before I spend money on things. I spent about $500 in total, and I’m ready to make sales. Again, you can see my gallery at AuerPhotoWorks.com or BrianAuer.com… and tell your friends.

Photo of the Day…

Manhattan Panorama

Photo by Brian Auer
06/28/06 New York, NY
Manhattan Panorama
8891 x 2000 pixels — 9 Images Stitched
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
150mm equiv * f/9 * 1/90s * ISO100

Roundup of Sharp Photography

In two previous posts, I wrote “6 Tips for Controlling Sharpness” and “Photo Sharpening Techniques” which described how to ensure sharp photos straight out of the camera and how to sharpen photos using Photoshop, respectively. As a finishing touch for my two part mini-series, I’ve gathered up a few other resources when it comes to sharp photos.

If you like video tutorials, here are a few from YouTube:

  • Photoshop Tutorial – Basic Sharpening shows how each of the sharpening filters affect the image. It also contains a pretty good section on just the Unsharp Mask and how to use it.
  • Advanced Sharpening gives a good tip on how to split the Unsharp Mask layer into light and dark pixels using blends. This is a great idea for those times when the highlights and halos are just a bit too extreme. I’ll definitely be using this one from now on.
  • Lab Sharpening in Photoshop is a good visual representation of the method I described in my previous post, where you sharpen the luminosity channel in LAB mode rather than the RGB image. The results are a little hard to see on the video, but the technique is there.

If you like to read:

  • Cambridge In Colour has an article that will help you understand sharpness if you’re still a little fuzzy about what it is and what it’s made of.
  • Photoshop Support has an in-depth screenshot-packed tutorial for how to use the High Pass filter and the Unsharp Mask filter for sharpening photos.
  • DIY Photography shows us how to make a tripod out of a soda bottle for those times when you don’t want to pack a full sized tripod.
  • Instructables shows us how to make a remote shutter release for a Pentax. If you don’t have a Pentax, I’m sure there’s a way to do it for your camera — you’ll just have to figure it out.
  • Photodoto has a tip for sharpening photos when you’re in a hurry.
  • About: Photography has some good leads if you can’t seem to avoid blurry images.

If all else fails, embrace the blur and call it art.

Photo of the Day…

Art

Photo by Brian Auer
02/24/07 New Jersey
Art
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Sigma 10-20mm F/4-5.6 EX DC HSM
20mm equiv * f/13 * 4.0s * ISO100

Stumbling Upon Photography

I’ve found that it’s sometimes difficult to find good photographers and other photography related content. It just seems that our niche is not as highly publicized as things like marketing, software, or other Internet-related topics. So I decided to try out the StumbleUpon! toolbar to see what it would do for me.

It’s quick to register and install, and you can be stumbling across the Internet in no time at all. The toolbar lets you stumble onto semi-random sites within your categories of choice. I’ve subscribed to several categories including photography, arts, and fine-arts (plus a few others not related to photography). So I tried stumbling just inside the Photography category to see what would pop up. Within 10 or 20 stumbles, I found: several great photographers I hadn’t seen before, lots of great photos, some cool photo contests, and miscellaneous good information. Here are a few of the photographers I came across:

If photography isn’t your only passion, there are a ton of other categories to choose from. What a great way to burn some time on the Internet.

Photo of the Day…

Dark Lake

Photo by Brian Auer
06/13/05 Minnesota
Dark Lake
Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3
47mm equiv * f/5 * 1/100s * ISO50

Photo Sharpening Techniques

As a follow-up to my previous post “6 Tips for Controlling Sharpness“, we’ll now focus on the post-processing side of things. Of course, you’ll still want to do everything in your control to get a sharp image when you release the shutter, but almost all photos can use some amount of sharpening via software. Your camera has the ability to sharpen photos as part of the processing, but you’ll be better off leaving the sharpening setting at zero in the camera — your computer can do a much better job. I’ll be using Adobe Photoshop CS3 for the following techniques, but they’re pretty generalized.

Sharpening should be the absolute last thing you do during post-processing. Any adjustments made after sharpening may accentuate the sharpening in a bad way, making the photo look over-sharpened or over-processed. So once you get the image looking the way you want it, here’s what you do:

  1. Create a new layer on top of the layer stack and rename it to “Sharpen” (Layer >> New >> Layer…).
  2. Select the new empty layer and press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+E to merge the layers below into the new layer. If you’re in a real hurry, skip to step 6 then jump to step 10.
  3. Now duplicate the layer into a new document so we can sharpen it (Right Click >> Duplicate Layer…).
  4. Switch to LAB color mode (Image >> Mode >> Lab Color).
  5. Go into your Channels Palette and select only the Lightness Channel. Your image should turn black & white now. We’re going to just sharpen the Lightness Layer so we don’t get artifacts from the color information.
  6. Now apply the Unsharp Mask to that selected channel (Filter >> Sharpen >> Unsharp Mask…).
    1. Set the Radius from 3 to 5 pixels and the Threshold to 2 or 3. These are just starting points.
    2. Raise the Amount to somewhere between 150% and 300%. You’ll want to stop when you see very distinct halos in the image. I usually start off around 200%.
    3. Now adjust the Radius until it gives good sharpness with limited halo effects.
    4. Adjust the Threshold to account for any noise that may be produced from the sharpening.
    5. Now go back to the Amount and lower it until the halos disappear. I usually end up between 50% and 150% depending on the photo.
    6. Once you’re happy, click OK. See the image below for examples of under-sharp, sharp, and over-sharp.
  7. Select the LAB Channel to reactivate all three channels, and go back to the Layers Palette.
  8. Switch back to RGB color mode (Image >> Mode >> RGB Color).
  9. Duplicate the layer back into the original document (Right Click >> Duplicate Layer…), delete the original Sharpen layer, and rename the new one to “Sharpen”.
  10. If you want to selectively sharpen some parts of the image less than others, you can apply a layer mask. If not, you’re done!
    1. Click on the little “Add Layer Mask” button at the bottom of the Layers Palette (dark box with a white circle).
    2. If you want to un-sharpen a few parts of the image, select the layer mask, grab a soft brush, set it to black, lower the opacity of the brush to 5 or 10%, and start painting OUT the sharpness.
    3. If you want to only sharpen a few parts of the image, you’ll first want to fill the mask with black, then you can grab the brush, set it to white, and do just like the previous step. But now you’re painting IN the sharpness.

The image below shows examples of under-sharp, sharp, and over-sharp samples viewed at 100%. You want to avoid the halos shown in the over-sharp example, but you’ll also want to be more aggressive than the under-sharp example.

Sharpening Examples

These are all just general guidelines, and every image requires a different amount of sharpening. I only went over the Unsharp Mask in this example, but Photoshop offers several others in the Sharpen Filter menu. I use the Unsharp Mask because it offers good control and it’s quick to apply. The other sharpening techniques may be substituted in the steps above for the Unsharp Mask Section. So go try it out, and you’ll see how just a small amount of sharpening can make big improvements in your photos.

Photo of the Day…

Graffiti Petey

Photo by Brian Auer
03/05/07 Neuchatel, Switzerland
Graffiti Petey
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
27mm equiv * f/3.5 * 1/30s * ISO100

6 Tips for Controlling Sharpness

Image sharpness can mean different things to different people. For the purposes of this article, sharpness is the crispness of a given photograph. It’s the clarity of detail in a photo, and it’s made of resolution and acuteness. There’s a good article on defining sharpness at the Cambridge in Color site.

Most of the time, you’ll want to get the sharpest image out of your camera possible. I say most of the time because there are instances where blur is a good thing. But for now, we’ll assume you want a good crisp photo. Sharpening a photo can be done in the post-processing, but it’s best to limit the amount of software sharpening because it can yield poor results if abused. The following 6 tips are things you should keep in mind before you release the shutter:

  1. Use a Tripod – We humans don’t make for a very sturdy platform, so (whenever possible) use a tripod to steady your camera. Some alternatives to the tripod are monopods, beanbags, logs, rocks, and string. Yes string.
  2. Shutter Speed – If you’re ignoring tip #1, you should at least be using a fast shutter speed. The rule of thumb is to use a shutter speed faster than 1/(focal length) — so a 200mm focal length should get a 1/250 second shutter speed. If you are using a tripod, you’ll want to avoid the 1/30 to 1/4 second range unless you lock your mirror up. The mirror slap can actually cause enough vibration to shake the camera a bit. If you can lock your mirror, do it.
  3. Aperture – The first part to this one is depth of field, more of which will at least create the appearance of higher sharpness. As you stop down the lens, more of your image will be in focus. The second part to the aperture tip is using the “sweet spot” for that lens. Every lens has an aperture that produces optimal sharpness results. For most, this is somewhere around two or three stops down from the maximum aperture (but do a little research on your particular lens).
  4. ISO Speed – Slower ISOs tend to resolve more detail, in addition to producing less noise. ALWAYS use the lowest ISO value possible! You should only bump the ISO when you can’t achieve the results you need by altering the shutter speed and aperture.
  5. Good Glass – High quality lenses give you the capability to produce high quality photos (technical quality). Buy the best you can afford. When doing your lens research, look for lenses with high resolution and high contrast. If you’re out for ultimate sharpness, a high quality prime lens will typically out-perform a high quality zoom.
  6. High Contrast – Our eyes naturally pick up on high contrast situations, and this can give your photo a better appearance of sharpness. Look for subjects that display high contrast, such as direct sunlight situations. You can also boost the contrast in post-production by using things like Photoshop’s levels and curves adjustments. In addition to lighting contrast, color contrast can improve the appearance of sharpness. Both types of contrast can be smothered by light hitting the front of the lens, creating a hazy photo. To avoid this, use a lens hood or shade the lens by some other method. Polarizing filters and UV filters also tend to help with sharpness by cutting out some of the haze and boosting contrast.

So there you have it. Keep these things in mind next time you’re trying to get that nice crisp shot, and your results are sure to improve. I’ve also written a Photo Sharpening Techniques article that shows how to add sharpness via post-processing.

Photo of the Day…

Statue of Liberty

Photo by Brian Auer
06/28/06 New York, NY
Statue of Liberty
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
200mm equiv * f/11 * 1/250s * ISO100

Selling Photos: Choosing Photo Gallery Software

Most of us who are semi-serious about our photography have at least some ambition of selling our work in one form or another. I tried the micro-stocks (bad idea) for a couple of months and I also have some of my photos for sale as (non-micro) commercial and editorial stock photography at ShutterPoint and KeenImages. I’ve come to the realization that commercial stock photography is not for me. Some people do it well and make a great living off of it, but it just doesn’t interest me. I would classify myself as more of artistic photographer rather than a commercial photographer. I’m not claiming to be an artist, I’m just saying I favor that side of the fence.

That said, I’m looking into putting up my own gallery site where I can offer prints of various sizes and paper qualities. I’ve already picked a print lab in the preliminary, I just need to try some test prints with them to make sure the quality is there. The lab is called myPhotopipe.com in case you’re interested. I’ve already got my domain names rounded up and purchased (they point to my blog for now) — BrianAuer.com and AuerPhotoWorks.com. So my first question to you is:

{democracy:3}

The last thing I need to do is actually put the gallery up on the web. I’m a programmer by hobby and I’m fluent in HTML, PHP, JavaScript, MySQL, and a few others. I could do it myself, but I don’t feel like putting the time or energy into it right now. Besides, there are lots of reasonable options out there that would take me months and months (maybe years) to do myself.

I’ve narrowed my choices down to three possible software packages: Lightbox, KTools, and Pixaria. Again, my goal is to have a gallery where I could offer up prints, not digital copies. If somebody wants a digital copy for commercial or editorial purposes, they can contact me about it. I won’t give my thoughts about each of these yet, because I’d like to know which one is your favorite pick. And don’t just pick the most expensive one because it has every bell and whistle you can imagine. Be honest, which one would you actually buy with your real life budget? If you know of any others that you think are better than these three, add it as an answer.

{democracy:4}

Photo of the Day…

The Graffiti Scooter

Photo by Brian Auer
03/05/07 Neuchatel, Switzerland
The Graffiti Scooter
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
135mm equiv * f/5.6 * 1/45s * ISO400

Camera Finders, Photo Flip-Books, and Lens Distortion

How Popular is Your Camera?

Photodoto poses the question “Is It Time For A New Camera?“  The question is followed up by a discussion around what’s popular with Flickr users.  Flickr has a tool called the Camera Finder that shows you the popularity of a particular camera over time.  So here’s the result for my Maxxum 7D with a whopping 58 users yesterday:

Maxxum 7D

And here’s the Maxxum 5D with a big 90 users yesterday:

Maxxum 5D

And, finally, here’s the Sony A-100 (the replacement for the Maxxum 5D) with 193 users yesterday:

A-100

Popularity is overrated.

People Shots: Flip-Book Style

Photojojo has a link to A Healthy Dose of Photo Inspiration in the form of a digital flip-book by George Lange.  The photos are all people shots, and the flip-book moves very fast.  You almost have to watch it a couple of times to catch it all.  People photography is not my strong point, and I envy anybody that can do it well.  George Lange has done it well, and I worship him for that.  George, you rock.  The photo of the day is a tribute to those who do people photography well.

Using Software to Correct Lens Distortion

About: Photography has some good leads for Correcting Lens Distortion using software.  Lens distortion can come in the form of either pincushion or barrel distortion (squeezed in or bulged out at the centers of the edges).  Photoshop can crudely fix the problem, but there are other software packages out there that help you target specific lenses.  I’m really considering picking one up because both of my zoom lenses exhibit some amount of distortion at their smallest focal lengths.  My 10-20mm has pincushion at 10mm and my 18-200mm has barrel distortion at 18mm.  Go figure.

Photo of the Day…

Pool Boy

Photo by Brian Auer
05/28/06 Flemington, NJ
Pool Boy (My Son, Rex)
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
105mm equiv * f/5.6 * 1/200s * ISO100

How To Fix Photo White Balance Using Photoshop

After having a small conversation with the author of Inspiration Bit in the comments of my last post, I thought I would do a little tutorial on fixing white balance in a photograph using Photoshop. White balance is that thing that either makes your photo look too warm, too cool, or just the right color temperature. Digital cameras have the ability to compensate for white balance, but sometimes they’re off a little. If you shoot in RAW, it’s a quick fix with Adobe Camera RAW during the processing of the file. If you don’t shoot in RAW and your photo turns out a bit off, you’ll have to do some additional editing to fix the problem.

In the example photos below, I created a warm photo by mis-processing with Adobe Camera RAW. Each of the examples below the first image were “fixed” using a different Photoshop technique. Before I begin, I have to say that white balance editing is not an exact science. It’s very subjective and depends a lot on your monitor settings too. You’ll notice that each of my example techniques are a bit different from each other. So let’s begin.

Here’s the image with the white balance set too warm. Notice that the trees have a yellow-green tint to them. So we’ll want to adjust the image to make it a bit cooler — I know, I know, it’s pretty “cool” to begin with, but I mean a cooler white balance.

Original

One quick and easy way to change your white balance is with a Photo Filter Adjustment Layer. I’ve applied a cooling filter (blue in color) to the image in order to offset the over-warmth. With this filter, you can change the color of the filter and the strength of the filter. You can see that the foliage is now greener and the sky even has a little blue tint to it.

Filter

Another quick edit is to use a Levels Adjustment Layer. In the levels dialog box you’ll see three little dropper buttons — one for black, one for gray, and one for white. Pick the middle button (gray) and start clicking around on the photo. You’ll notice that the color cast changes as you click on different colors. You want to try picking a flat gray somewhere in the photo (if there is one) and it should get you pretty close on white balance. Like I said, this one is quick, but it’s kind of limited to photos that contain that gray point. Plus it’s kind of a gamble.

Levels

Using a Curves Adjustment Layer gives you more control over the luminosity in your photo, but it also gives you more control over your color channels. There’s a drop down box at the top of the dialog that allows you to edit the RGB (luminosity) channel, the red channel, the green channel, and the blue channel. In the case of a warm photo, you’ll want to pull the red curve down and to the right to tone down the red colors. You’ll also want to pull the blue channel up and to the left in order to tone up the blue colors. Just do the opposite for a cool photo. The green is usually okay where it’s at, but you can play with that one too. To make your life easier, do the white balance adjustments in a separate curves adjustment layer than your luminosity — there’s no limit to how many you can have stacked on top of each other.

Curves

As I mentioned before, you can change the white balance of your RAW photos using Adobe Camera RAW (actually you have to because RAW files don’t have white balance applied to them). Before Photoshop CS3 (still in beta), you could only open RAW files with Adobe Camera RAW. But CS3 is great, and you can open JPEGs using the ACR interface. The interface just has a little slider bar for white balance and you slide it back and forth to make your image warmer or cooler. Handy!!!

ACR

There are a couple of other ways to adjust white balance (like a color balance adjustment), but these four are probably the most straight forward. I’ll typically use the curves adjustment when I’m working with JPEGs, and I’ll use ACR when I’m working with RAW files. So next time you forget to change your white balance settings on your camera and end up with a bunch of colorful photos, you’ll at least be able to salvage them — with a little work.

Photo by Brian Auer
09/17/06 Vernon, NJ
The Flying Mountain Biker
Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D
Konica Minolta AF DT 18-200
39mm equiv * f/8 * 1/60s * ISO100