Monthly Archives: December 2009

Challenge Yourself in 2010 with PhotoChallenge.org

One of the best ways to improve your photography is to challenge yourself and push the limits of your comfort zone. Photographing subjects or situations outside of your norm will force you to apply your existing knowledge to a new thing. And in the process, you’ll be learning things and picking up new tricks.

PhotoChallenge.org is a website/blog committed to challenging photographers. In 2007, Trevor Carpenter, started challenging photographers to shoot 1-photo-per-day monthly themes or challenges, and continued that into 2008 when PhotoChallenge.org was officially launched. Also in 2008, Trevor started a yearly challenge to photograph a single subject each week for the entire year. 2009 included challenges on a different topic each day — and I applaud anybody that could keep up with that schedule!

In 2010, PhotoChallenge.org will be changing it up yet again. We’ll have monthly themes (4 weeks each, actually), but you’ll only be asked to shoot one photo per week on the topic — so 4 total for each challenge. The new format will allow more people to keep up with the challenges, because shooting every day can be tedious for some of us.

The first challenge is “Resolution” and you can basically take that theme any way you see fit and shoot a photo that reflects your personal interpretation. After 4 weeks of “Resolution” they guys at PhotoChallenge.org will announce the next theme.

Really, it’s all in the name of learning new things and having a good time. You’re more than welcome to join in or opt out as you choose and nobody is keeping tabs on you if you miss a week or two. So if you’re looking for new ways to expand your skill set, jump over to PhotoChallenge.org and see what they have in store for the new year.

My Favorite Photos From 2009

Ah yes… another year is coming to an end and it’s time to reflect on what we accomplished in the last 12 months. With photography, it’s pretty easy to look back on our work and pull together a collection of favorites. I did a similar thing at the end of 2007 and 2008. And each year, I’ve been reminded and encouraged to do so by two friends: Hitesh Sawlani and Jim Goldstein.

Hitesh always manages to remind me about the year end photo thing, and I adopted his monthly format that you see below. You can also see his 2009 post on his blog.

Jim also encourages this yearly reflection by hosting a group project on his blog. The idea is to look back on your year and create a blog post or Flickr set containing your best and/or favorite photos from the year. A lot of people participate in this thing, so it’s cool to get in on the action.

And with that, here are my photos that I feel are worthy of looking back on.

JANUARY

I kicked off the year with a photowalk up in Newport Beach with a few buddies and my Son. It was a decent photowalk… nothing huge, just a chance to get out and grab some shots.

Frenzy

Sunny Sailing Beach Photographers Cheese Popular Location Sunset at the Pier

In mid January, I took the Wife and Kids up to North Idaho to visit family (because ticket prices for Christmas time are outrageous). It was good to get back up there during snow season. Did a little landscape photography, skiing (with a camera of course), and relaxing (without cameras).

Dam... That's a Lot of Water

Rough Characters Winter Docks Winter at the Lake The Ride Up
Frozen Fields Take a Knee Casting Shadows Casting Shadows Reach

FEBRUARY

Went out on a spectacular photo excursion with fellow photographer Richard Wong. We made our way around the Salton Sea and I can honestly say that it is the most surreal place I’ve ever been. Just a strange mixture of beauty and decay all out in the middle of nowhere.

Salton Sea Sunset

Desperate for Attention Trailer Puke Poolaroid Environment Fail Salvation Mountain
Name Forgotten Old Green Trailer Once Upon a Time Underneath It All

Also did more photowalking with the pals up in West Hollywood. My good friend Bryan Villarin was also playing with his band at the Whisky A Go Go that night, so I got a little taste of concert photography.

Cab Plus Two Palm Trees

Broken Phone Bryan Mel's Drive In Smile The Scarlet Paradigm

MARCH

Had a couple of small photowalks in San Clemente and La Jolla while testing out the new medium format Kodak Ektar 100 film.

La Jolla Pier

San Clemente Pier I Stand Alone The Umbrella La Jolla Coastline

APRIL

Did a quick photowalk with a friend in Oceanside before heading up to the Grand Prix in Long Beach. Tried out some awesome orthochromatic film I got from my buddy the_wolf_brigade, but ultimately shot 100% digital for the race.

Beach Apartments

Long Beach Grand Prix 2009 Long Beach Grand Prix 2009 Pipeline 489 Shooting the Argus C3
Tires Surfboard Parking Oceanside Lifeguards Bailey at the Beach

MAY

My Brother came down to visit and we did the SoCal tourist thing for a few days — San Diego one day, Venice Beach and Hollywood the next. I also took the Wife and Kids on a short trip to the mountains for Mother’s Day for horseback riding and hot springs. Oh, and Memorial Day up at Lake Arrowhead with my Aunt and Uncle.

Do Not Climb on the Sculpture

The "Fly N Lion" Muscle Beach The Friendly Horse Photo of a Street Photographer Harry Perry Watch Your Head Los Calavera
My Bro Uncle Pat Wind-Blown Bailey

JUNE

Didn’t do a whole lot in June other than the San Diego County Fair. I had a couple of photos in the art display, so it was fun to check them out with the other entries. We probably spent half our day just looking at artwork.

Rides at the Fair

Polish Sausage Win Big Prizes Totally Fried Chevelle Chair in the Grass

JULY

Did the 4th of July celebration thing with my Cousin up at Lake Arrowhead… I’m still amazed at how many boats get on the water at one time. I also did a few solo photowalks in Pacific Beach and Point Loma with the TLR.

Gangsta

Homeless, Names Unknown Car in a Cart Pacific Beach Perspective
Bobby The Modern DJ Shine Down

AUGUST

August was mostly family time. The kids were up in Idaho for most of the summer with the Grandparents, so we spent a lot of time with them when they got back before school started. I also met up with Jim Goldstein for a short time while he was down for a wedding — it was good to finally shake his hand and chat with him outside of Skype.

Rex

Bailey Biker Mom Venice Beach "Doctor's Office" I'm Broke

SEPTEMBER

Labor Day was the only real photo-op we had in September — with school starting back up and everybody getting into their schedules, we didn’t do a whole lot else.

Jake

Two Beers. All Set. Beers at the Beach Mikasa Friendly Gesture

OCTOBER

October was filled by a few family visits and whatnot… but nothing really major happened.

Don't Look Down

The Bartender Spin the Rex Backyard Bailey Chevelle

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

Either I didn’t take many photos in the last few months, or I just haven’t developed/scanned/processed anything. At any rate, I spent a lot of time hanging out with family for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

SO HOW WAS MY YEAR?

Honestly, I’m not totally impressed with myself this year. I didn’t do as much photo-taking as I would have liked, and I definitely didn’t do as much photo-printing either. I also felt a fairly large shift in my photographic focus this year. I spent more time just capturing the events and gatherings that I happened to be a part of rather than going out and looking for opportunities… sort of a passive approach I guess. I did a few photowalks and outings, but not like I had in the past.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing… just a different thing. I’m not a professional photographer by any means, so I can afford to drift with my focus and intent. But in general, I’ve keep the same passion for photography that I’ve always had — I’ve just been more relaxed about it. And maybe that’s what I needed this year to motivate me for something new next year.

WHAT’S NEXT?

I’m not sure what the new year has in store for me. I would guess that I’ll be shooting more film and less digital though. I’m also hoping to get the color darkroom set up soon so I can fully utilize my collection of negatives (sucks not being able to print nearly half of my work just because it’s not b/w). I would like to focus more on printing before I fall too far behind on my archives and the whole situation turns into a lost cause.

The Darkroom

For equipment, I don’t plan on acquiring anything new… OK, maybe a large format camera of some sort, but no definite plans yet. And like I said, my darkroom is almost complete and ready for color and b/w developing and printing so I should be fine there (unless I do actually get a large format camera). At any rate, definitely no plans for new digital equipment.

Subject-wise, I’d like to focus more on street photography and street portraits. I did a good deal this year, but I want to get out and do more. Street photography with my newly refurbished rangefinder, and street portraits with my trusty TLR.

And as far as websites go, I do have a joint venture in the works that should launch sometime in January. But I’m sworn to secrecy, so that’s all I can say.

How about you guys??? How was 2009 for you? Is anybody else planning on participating in Jim’s project?

PhotoDump 12-28-2009

More great stuff from the Epic Edits Flickr Pool! This selection of photos is from those entered in the pool between 12/14 and 12/28.

On a side note, I took some time off last week from the day job and blogging to relax and hang out with the family, so things have been a little quiet around here. But I’ve got a few posts lined up for this week, and some bigger stuff as we cross into the new year. So hang in there, and enjoy the remainder of your holiday time (unless you used it all up last week like I did).

Lucy Conquered Man 4 by cabbitFog and Ice by VickerMonkeeLicht am Ende des Tunnels by icatus by edomnitzWit-White by inipixMerry Christmas... from Death Valley!? by jimgoldstein337:365 - the lips, the teeth, the tip of the tongue by bubble dumpsterThe Merchant: Up, Close & Personal.. by SonOfJordanbathroom by xgrayone day I will. by ana.gr¿Thinking? by Sebastian.YEPESLove is blind by Daniel.VStreet Music by Sebastian.YEPESSnowy trees, film style by Tasha {Redwall Photo}© Rex Lisman-0162 by Rex Lisman PhotographyBubble in Reality by Marcus LibäckKing Edward I at Paddington by CdL Creative by the_wolf_brigadeuntitled by .f_}x{Time and Men by gildericDay 269 - Monotone by __multifacetedJustine in the windows #2 by Ed_Z© Rex Lisman-0232 by Rex Lisman PhotographyJ.Esquire by 3SonsProductions

Win Cash With Competico Photo Contests

There are many ways to make money from your photos, and contests/competitions are a unique approach. Rather than sell your work or time, you compete with your talent and experience. Contests and competitions can take many forms, but online avenues are probably the easiest to participate in.

Competico is an online photo competition website that offers cash prizes based on community votes and panel judges. Each contest has a specific theme and maximum cash prize available. It also appears that several new contests launch each month. Entry fees are generally between $2 and $15 per photo, and a percentage of those fees go toward the prizes.

Competico Winter Holidays Photo Contest

Right now, Competico is running a bigger contest with some huge cash prizes. The theme is “Winter Holidays”, the entry fee is $100 per photo, and prizes up to $50,000! The entry is steeper than their usual contest, but the rewards are too. This contest ends January 12, 2009 and the winners will be announced on the 15th.

ENTER THE WINTER HOLIDAYS PHOTO CONTEST HERE

If that one is a little too steep for you, consider checking out the ongoing contests for various themes. As I write this, there are 8 open contests in a full range between $2 and $15 entry fees. And if none of the themes spark your interest at the moment, check back from time to time.

Competico

VIEW THE COMPETICO HOME PAGE

As with any photo contests or competitions, be sure you read the terms and conditions before agreeing to them. If you’re not comfortable with the terms, don’t submit your photos.

Link Roundup 12-20-2009

Happy Holidays, everyone! Here’s some stuff to keep you busy this week.

60 Second Post-Processing Technique

Dictionary : Time
Creative Commons License photo credit: Kat…

The technique outlined here really just applies to a first round of processing — this might be acceptable for posting to Flickr, but a fine art print would require much more time and effort on your part. Also, I’m not talking about doing black and white conversions, crazy artistic interpretations, creative cropping, etc. We just want to make the photo look more natural at this point.

60 seconds may sound fast to some people, but it may sound like an eternity to others. Sure, it’s way too short for print preparation and it’s way too long for working through hundreds of stock submissions that might have basically the same white balance, exposure, and/or subject matter. But this method is intended to use your time effectively while giving each photo individual attention.

The steps below are for Lightroom or ACR users working with raw digital files.

SHARPEN AND REDUCE NOISE (0 SECONDS)

Article: Save Time with Sharpen and Noise Presets

In most situations, the sharpening and noise reduction settings can be applied in batches for any given camera and ISO range. Just build a sharpening and noise reduction preset and apply it to all the images you’ll be processing further. This can be done before or after any other editing, but I like to get it done up front so I don’t forget.

The exception to this rule of batch processing is when you have photos outside the “normal” camera setting ranges. This means that photos with high ISO or long handheld shutter speeds will typically require some individual attention, but everything else can be processed with presets for typical use.

STRAIGHTEN AND CROP (+10 SECONDS)

Straightening

Not every photo is going to require this step, but let’s just include it as a worst case scenario. The main intent should be straightening anything that’s slightly misaligned from what you want. I’d say keep the creative cropping to a minimum at this point — you can go back during in-depth processing and toy around with it.

To straighten, just use the Straighten tool and drag your horizontal or vertical line. The rotated crop will automatically be applied and you can move on to the next step.

WHITE BALANCE (+15 SECONDS)

White Balance

Cameras aren’t very good at picking white balance, so some adjustment is usually beneficial. By default, your image white balance may be set to As Shot. What I like to do is highlight the pull-down menu and scroll through the auto and predefined settings to see which one gets me the closest. In some cases this will be enough, in other cases you’ll have to make a slight adjustment manually. If you have a good neutral gray source in the photo, you can also use the White Balance Tool to save some time.

I would suggest doing this step before making any basic adjustments because I’ve noticed that different white balances will give different automatic exposure settings in the next step.

BASIC ADJUSTMENTS (+25 SECONDS)

Basic Adjustments

This is an area that you could spend a lot of time messing with, but you can also get a really good result with minimal effort. The first thing I do is hit the Auto and Default adjustment a few times back and forth so I can evaluate which one gives a better starting point.

Once I have my basic starting point, I take a quick look at the histogram to evaluate where things are at (I’ll actually do a separate article for working with histograms). Then I just run down the group of sliders from top to bottom until I get things pretty close.

  1. Modify your Exposure if the image is inherently too dark or bright.
  2. Add Recovery to pull back heavy or clipped highlights.
  3. Add Fill Light to push up heavy or clipped shadows.
  4. Add Blacks if your shadows look dull.
  5. Modify your Brightness to shift the overall brightness or darkness.
  6. Modify your Contrast if the image looks too flat or too punchy.

You could end your processing right there if you punch up the contrast enough, but I like to leave it a little flat for the next step. I also don’t usually apply any Clarity, Vibrance, or Saturation adjustments in this round of editing. You’ll find that a good contrast and tone adjustment will really boost the colors.

TONE ADJUSTMENT (+10 SECONDS)

Tone Curves

I actually find that the Tone Adjustment does a better job at dealing with contrast because it offers more control by splitting the highlights and shadows. Most of the time, I’ll only adjust the Lights and Darks sliders until I see a pleasing contrast level. Many images will only require a slight “S curve” to get you where you need to be.

Now, if you don’t leave the Basic Adjustments slightly flat, you’ll get really exaggerated contrast results after applying Tone Adjustments. Then you’ll have to go back to the other panel and turn things down — which of course takes more time.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Am I way off base here? Am I spending too much time on basic first-round adjustments? Am I not spending enough time per image? What do you do with your images you intend to post or share through informal mediums? Here’s the before with the example photo used above:

Before and After 60 Seconds

Not a huge difference, but quite noticeable at full screen. At any rate, it’s in a more “natural” state and it should be much easier to evaluate and detail process from here.

I would say that the 60 seconds could be reduced to 30 if several things fall into place: straight horizons out of the camera, correct white balance out of the camera, and good exposure out of the camera. A well captured image requires very little post work, but it should require some if it’s a raw image. On the other hand, you could easily require 2 or 3 minutes per photo if you’re doing a lot of corrections due to a poor capture.

Save Time with Sharpen and Noise Presets

beautiful time
Creative Commons License photo credit: I, Timmy

A lot of photographers produce a ton of photos, and those photos usually need some amount of post processing to at least make them look natural. Those who are doing stock photography process a lot of photos, but a lot of us also post a decent amount to blogs or photo sharing websites. It doesn’t take too long to figure out that saving time during post is good.

So in this article, I’m sharing a small tip for using Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw presets for sharpening and noise reduction settings. These are settings that generally don’t change much between photos and they can effectively be applied to batches of photos to save time. I should also note that this tutorial is based on Adobe Camera Raw, and Lightroom should be very similar (though I don’t have the software to confirm that). If you guys see any huge differences, let me know and I’ll update the article.

HOW TO CREATE YOUR PRESET

Here are the basic steps in Adobe Camera Raw (similar to Lightroom) for creating a sharpen and noise reduction preset that can be applied in batches. Screenshots for each step are shown below — click for larger versions.

  1. Pick a good baseline photo — well exposed, somewhere around ISO200-400 (unless you typically shoot somewhere else), a shutter speed of 1/125 seconds or faster (again, unless you typically shoot somewhere else), and with good sharp focus.
  2. Open it up for processing, zoom to 100% or 200% in a sharp area, and go to your “Detail” panel with the sharpening and noise reduction settings. You can see my before and after settings for my baseline photo.
  3. Adjust the sliders until you get a decent result. Don’t over-do it — over-processed photos are much more noticeable than under-processed photos.
  4. Now save the settings in a Preset by going to your preset panel and creating a new one. Uncheck everything except for “Sharpening” and the two “Noise Reduction” boxes.

Create -  Step 1 Create -  Step 2 Create -  Step 3 Create -  Step 4

HOW TO APPLY YOUR PRESET

Now that you have a preset (or set of presets for various cameras and/or ISO settings) you can apply it to many photos at the same time. With Bridge, you can select the photos you want to adjust, right click, go to “Develop Settings”, and choose your preset. Within Adobe Camera Raw, you can select the photos you want to adjust, go to the “Presets” panel, and choose your preset. With Lightroom, you can probably do it either way but it’s been a while since I used Lightroom and I no longer have the software installed — so you Lightroom users will have to correct me if I’m wrong.

Apply with Bridge Apply with Adobe Camera Raw

WHAT ELSE DO YOU PRESET?

You can save pretty much any setting as a preset with Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw. So what do you guys have in your list of presets that you use all the time? Lens corrections? Camera calibration? Basic settings? Black and white conversions? Do share!

PhotoDump 12-14-2009

More great stuff from the Epic Edits Flickr Pool! This selection of photos is from those entered in the pool between 11/29 and 12/14.

Oceano Dunes after storm by i_shoot_minoltaYou're As Good As New by nathanielperalesLast Train Home by JanneMpontus by bildterapispiritualized imagination by sharaffAimee Creating by nathanielperalesstuck in my mind; underwater; TENERIFE by javiyFrom the streets by robinn.Justine in the window by Ed_ZShut off your eyes, Let your mind wonder by Song KeatBored by DPicturer by the_wolf_brigadeTwo Beers. All Set.nursery blur by rayzr55Disable musician at Gaya Street by dusunmanMy  beautiful  eye ^^ by - ?? ?•°°•°•°?low by ana.grCheng Wee by jk+too by the_wolf_brigadeAu Museé du Louvre by analox & admiréKarekare Beach by Magical PlacesSwedish + Noir et Blanc by Sebastian.YEPESsitting at sunset by {tribal} photographySunrise over Green Lake by cftarnasA Cinderella Story by kellinasfThe reader by -theworldends-Library of Congress by sweetspot@f8 - FullManualControl.ComFew will care by Bryan VillarinThe Whites - Sara by cabbiti can fly by robinn.

Lens Rental Winners

I recently announced that we were teaming up with the folks from BorrowLenses.com to give out a couple free one-week rentals. In just a few days, we had a great turnout with 152 raffle entries between comments, Tweets, and blog posts. The Twitter entries were a new thing here on Epic Edits, but I think we’ll use that avenue again in the future. We had 83 accounts link to the post, generating nearly 400 additional visitors — a big thanks to everyone who participated!

And now, here are the lucky winners:

Lens Rental Winners

We had Matthew Dillon and Bob with comments at the #9 and #123 spots. Enjoy the rentals guys!

Photography Books Make Great Gifts!

Knowledge makes him young
Creative Commons License photo credit: hapal

It is very much the holiday season, and gifts are often a part of that. As photographers, we like to receive certain types of gifts… sometimes equipment, and sometimes things that inspire or educate us. Equipment can be a difficult gift to give because we’re often very picky about what we want. But photo books and photography books almost always please (and good photo books are great even for non-photographers).

Over the last few years, I’ve reviewed an assortment of books. This post is a gathering of those in-depth reviews. Most of them are photo books (whose main content is the actual photo rather than the paragraph), but I’ve done a few technical/educational books too. So if you’re looking for a gift for a photographer (or anybody with a coffee table really), here are some excellent choices.

PHOTO BOOKS


Reza War and Peace

Reza War and Peace is a book about many things, very deep and emotional. As the title suggests, the book is about war and peace. But it’s so much more than that too. This book is a testimony of humanity — at its worst, and at its best. It is comprised of 30 years of Reza’s work from across the world, and it contains some of the most incredible stories I never knew.

Of all the books I’ve reviewed, this is probably my favorite. Truly great work from a great photographer.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Polar Obsession

Polar Obsession

An intimate view the northern and southern polar regions, including the animals and their environments. Paul specializes in photographing the Arctic and Antarctica with an emphasis on underwater photography, and it would seem that no location is out of his reach.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


44 Days: Iran and the Remaking of the World

44 Days: Iran and the Remaking of the World

This book covers the history of the Iranian Revolution of 1979 when the Shah was overthrown and the Islamic Republic was born. The major parts of this event took place in a mere 44 days, and David Burnett was there to capture a big part of it. Everything from mass protests, funerals, killings, the fall and rise of power, and everything else associated with the revolution.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


The Life of a Photograph

This is a collection of work from Sam Abell’s experience in the field as a National Geographic photographer. But the book isn’t about National Geographic or the stories covered by the photos — it’s about Sam Abell, his photos, and how they’ve taken on a life of their own.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Odysseys and Photographs

This book is a collection of amazing photographs from four historic storytellers, and many of the images have rarely been seen outside of the National Geographic archives. The four photographers featured exhibit a collective work spanning most of the 20th century. Not only is the work extremely artistic, it’s also historic and serves as a permanent record of the World’s past.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Visions of Paradise

Visions of Paradise is a collective publication from some of the most world renowned photographers of our time. 82 individuals attempt to present the audience with a vision of paradise based on their experience and travels. Each chapter is filled with brilliant and breathtaking imagery as large as life itself. Ranging from one to two page spreads, the photos contained in the book are easily appreciated and adored.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Night Vision: The Art of Urban Exploration

Night Vision is a book about urban exploration — or the investigation of man-made places ignored and largely unseen. This includes old “ghost towns” and other sites that have been left to decay out of sight. Troy is a master of urban exploration, and he shares his thoughts and feelings on the topic throughout.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Live, Laugh, Celebrate

This book is a collection of photographs from all over the Earth taken by many different photographers. This format suits the subject well because it allows for a wide display of imagery that wouldn’t be possible from a single photographer. But even with a diverse set of photos such as this, they’re all similar in the fact that they show people living, laughing, and celebrating. A good quick read and easy to get caught up in the photos.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Mothers and Children

Mothers and Children

The photos in the book take us on a trip around the world while showing the many expressions and emotions of mothers and their children. This is a good one to have on the bookshelf or the coffee table.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKS


What the Duck: A W.T. Duck Collection

What the Duck: A W.T. Duck Collection

Well… it’s a comic strip book. Don’t expect to find any breathtaking photos or golden nuggets of technical advice. The theme of the comic strip is a duck photographer and his journeys in the business. But you don’t have to be a professional to “get it”, since many of the strips are humorous to a wide spectrum of photographers.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Fundamentals of Photography

Photography is such an expansive subject and it’s quite impossible to cover everything in a single book. Some books focus on very specific topics, but contain in-depth information. Other books are broad, but just skim the surface. Regardless of the style, many informational photography books drone on page after page, leaving the reader in a haze of technobabble and jargon. I don’t know how he did it, but Tom Ang managed to pack an incredible amount of information into this small handbook. Not only is the information valuable, it’s extremely concise and well laid out.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Complete Digital Photography

Complete Digital Photography

The book focuses on the realm of digital photography, addressing those of us currently involved with digital photography and those looking to become involved. Digital cameras have matured over the last several years, bringing with them professionals and amateurs. Good photography is within reach for many people, and this book helps to lay the foundation for this hobby/profession.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


The Essential Guide to Portrait Photography

The Essential Guide to Portrait Photography

Whether you’re shooting informal family pictures or professional portraits, you’ll likely find new things in this eBook.

Purchase from dPS

Read my full review


Sony Alpha DSLR A300/A350 Digital Field Guide

This is a great resource book for the Sony A300 and A350 photographer. It covers just about everything you can find in your user manual, plus a whole lot of practical stuff. New users will benefit the most from this book, as the assignments in Part 3 will familiarize them with the camera in-use.

Purchase from Amazon.com

Read my full review


Do you guys have any other book recommendations? And which books would you like to receive this year?