Tag Archives: fine art

A Year of Beach Culture Photography

[If you’d like to grab this video, you can get it at YouTube]

Every region has it’s own special culture and atmosphere, just waiting to be experienced. The Southern California beach towns are no exception! It’s been one year since I moved to San Diego, and I’ve been captivated by the beach towns that lie along the Pacific Coastline. As a photographer, I’ve made it a point to explore and document these towns, in hopes that I’ll eventually be able to share something greater than individual photos.

What I’m sharing today isn’t a finished product — it’s still in the making. The video above and the slideshow below are just a sample of what I hope to achieve some day. I’m lucky to be able to live in such a great place, and I don’t know how long I’ll have that ability. Prior to living here, I lived in New Jersey and I got to experience the East Coast culture and New York City culture. Unfortunately, I wasn’t in full swing with my photography and I missed a great opportunity to document an amazing region. I don’t plan on making that mistake again.

And to help me finish this project, I’d like to get your help. For the next year of my existence in Southern California, I’ll be photographing with this project in mind. Based on what you’ve seen here, give me some feedback. What’s working? What’s not? What’s missing? What’s overdone? What places or things can I photograph to better capture the culture? When you think of Southern California beach towns, what comes to mind? I’d love to get some feedback from all of you.

It’s Lonely Out Here

It's Lonely Out Here

Brian Auer | 06/29/2008 | Huntington Beach, CA | 135mm * f/2.8 * 1/?s * ISO50
[Purchase Prints] [See it at Flickr]

This photo is quickly becoming one of my personal favorites — but we have yet to see if it stands the test of time. It was shot recently at Huntington Beach around the same time and location that my “Darkness Creeps In” photo was taken. Like that photo, this one was also taken on film — Ilford PanF Plus, which is rated at ISO 50. This was the first roll of PanF I’ve used, but the results remind me of the Ilford HP5. Nice smooth tones and gradients, and lower contrast than films like the Delta, XP2, or Neopan. I think it goes well with an old camera and glass, giving the photo more of an “old school” look and feel.

POST-PROCESSING

Shoot, develop, scan, upload. That’s one of the things I like about film — you can often get great looking and interesting results without post processing. It’s actually a relief sometimes when you don’t feel obligated to process a set of photos.

Darkness Creeps In

Darkness Creeps In

Brian Auer | 06/29/2008 | Huntington Beach, CA | 135mm * f/2.8 * 1/?s * ISO50
[Purchase Prints] [See it at Flickr]

This photo was taken while I was hanging out with a few friends one afternoon at Huntington Beach. It was kind of a last minute “whatcha doin this weekend” sort of thing. Bryan Villarin (F/B/T), Arnold (F/T), Jason Stone (F/B/T), John Watson (F/B/T), my son Rex (F), and I (F/B/T) were all there to grab some shots of the beach and pier while we waited for the sunset to see if anything exciting would happen (you can see them all in this Polaroid I took).

The Guys at Huntington Beach

Just as we were finishing up dinner, the sunset was approaching so we zoomed back over to the beach to grab some shots. I only had film cameras with me that day (4 of them), and I had been shooting black and white with my SLR and TLR. I still had about 10 shots on the roll in the SLR, so I finished that one off and quickly loaded a roll of Velvia 50 with the intent of cross processing. I got about half way through the roll before the sun was gone. If I had decided to swap out the roll in my TLR, I probably would have missed it altogether.

I took the Velvia with me solely for the purpose of shooting the sunset and cross processing it. I assumed that the Velvia 50 would turn out the same as the Velvia 100 when cross processed, so I was expecting to get some serious red/magenta shifts on the already red/orange sunset. Instead, I got a blue/green shift similar to what I’ve seen with Ektachrome. I’m not at all disappointed with the results… it’s just not what I had expected.

And on top of all that, I got this really neat photo that ended up with a heavy vignette/underexposure on the right side of the frame. Very cool results all around. This is one of the reasons I’m attracted to film — sometimes the results are completely unpredictable, but better than you had expected.

POST-PROCESSING

  1. Take exposed film out of camera
  2. Give film to camera store and say “Cross process, please. No prints and no cuts.”
  3. Go outside and take photos for 15 minutes
  4. Go back to the store and pick up film
  5. Take film home and scan
  6. Post photo on the Internet

Yup, seriously… no digital post processing other than maybe some dust removal. Sometimes I also adjust the white balance on my cross processed stuff to remove most of the color cast, but I left this one alone.

Defining Fine Art Photography

Waiting for a moment
Creative Commons License photo credit: ^riza^

In the previous poll, I asked “What is Fine Art Photography?” as an open-ended question. We had some really awesome responses, and those who offered up their thoughts definitely put some effort into it. Since we had so many great comments, I had a hard time picking out any that stood above the rest. So rather than feature a few comments, here are some excerpts from all the comments:

Neil Creek

… My rule of thumb definition would be “if I’d be happy to hang it on my wall” it’s fine art. But that’s probably too broad a definition for most. I think the key thing is that “fine art” is completely subjective. No one will agree what is fine art, but it might be easier to get consensus about what isn’t… read more

Niels Henriksen

… The adjective I think is Fine-art, one word and this has an understanding in the artistic and commercial world. This nomenclature is restricted to certain forms of works of art such as painting, sculpture, printmaking, theatre and architecture. Notice how photography is not fine-art just by itself, but shows up when we actually produce prints. It is the actual output or visual art that becomes the fine art… Fine art is also being used to describe a level of quality and sophistication about one’s work… I will also wholly control the output process… read more

Norbert

Fine art is a field in which the photographer makes the image. Those who just shoot to shoot really do not qualify to be called fine artist. As one who works extremely hard to create I can say that it is the insight and eye that creates the art. I may not come back with what I initially thought I was going to shoot but that is due to the change of the elements and this change also is the process of creating art… read more

Scott Ward

I believe fine art encompasses two things…
1. The photograph should be a “good” photograph. It should be well composed, sharp, evoke an emotional response, etc. This can also be very subjective and market-driven…
2. The media makes a difference. If I am looking to invest in a fine art photograph, I don’t want one that will begin to show noticeable fading in 25 years. I want a print that will last a lifetime and beyond if possible. I believe that fine art is an investment that will raise in value over the years, but it will not if the actual print will not give it time to accrue value…
A fine art photographer would be one, then, to create such works… read more

Dawn

I think that this is completely subjective. It can range from photojournalistic photography to completely Photoshopped photography that doesn’t even resemble photography anymore. However, it is going to be upscaled photography that definitely pays attention to the canons of photography: lighting, composition, focus, etc… If someone is willing to pay for the photography and they want it hanging on their walls, then they probably consider it fine art… read more

Chica

For me it’s simplicity with a punch. Something that when you look at it, you just know that it is something more. You cannot wrap my mind around it, your awed, and inspired at the same time. I rarely come across photos like these. There are many kinds of art photographs that I consider amazing, but rarely something I’d label “fine”. You inspired me to look through Wikipedia for the answer, and really there isn’t an answer… Who’s to say what fine art is? It can be generalized, but not defined… read more

John P Sercel

I tend to agree with Niels, in that Fine Art is the image (in this case) that the artist creates – art for beauty’s sake – and is completely separate from the media it is finally transferred to. It is a kind of dangerous definition, I suppose, to say that the artists designates his own work as fine art, but then I don’t know of any absolute metric that can be used… read more

Chris Lohman

It’s funny that this topic came up. Just the other day I posted a pic on a “Critique My Photo” blog for Fotki. The pic was my attempt at Fine Art Photography. The title of the post was simply “Fine Art?”. I received a wide variety of responses and not alot on my pic. Rather the debate was about what is “Fine Art” …??? One of the best post was the following… read more

Alessandro Rosa

When I thought about your question of what fine art photography is, the word crafted came to mind. The dictionary definition for crafted (v.) helps explain my viewpoint: “To make or construct (something) in a manner suggesting great care or ingenuity.” So I would say that to be considered a fine art photograph, the image needs to be crafted by the artist, or to restate it I would say that my definition of a fine art photograph is an image that is made in a manner suggesting great care, ingenuity and skill. So subject, lighting, composition and idea are well thought out, display a mastery of the craft of photography and are executed to produce an image of superior quality. Unfortunately, I don’t think that there is anything that can really quantify what the quality is, it is one of those “I’ll know it when I see it things.” Such is art… read more

Pixie

I believe that fine art photography is less about product, and more about the artist’s vision- a commentary of sorts. Yes, the photographer needs skill, in lighting, composition, exposure etc. but not as much for the purpose of creating a “good” photograph but because to be an artist one must have the skill to effectively communicate one’s vision… I have to completely disagree with those who say that it is about what sells — that may be essential in stock photography for example, but I believe that the artist that is solely producing work because it is what the consumer wants to see has lost sight of their own artistic vision… read more

Harley Pebley

I don’t have anything to add regarding the definition, but do have a recent conversation to relate that I thought was interesting. A friend and I were leaving an annual arts festival featuring local painters and sculptors; all sorts of styles and skill levels. One of these things where you pay a fee and you’re in. I commented on the lack of photographers and suggested it might be interesting for us to try to put something together for next year. I was told we wouldn’t be allowed since photography isn’t fine art… read more

One reader even took things a step further and posted his thoughts on his own blog.

Damien Franco

… Conceptualizing an image from the moment of capture to print should, perhaps, maintain an integrity consistent with evoking feeling… I believe, however, that you can label yourself as a Fine Art Photographer or produce work that is Fine Art Photography if you are placing yourself at the mercy of those who may be more qualified to validate your work… The funny thing is that after you have successfully been deemed, by those in the industry, as a tried and true “Fine Artist” every work you have done prior to the acclaimed label is now acceptable as “Fine Art”. If you’re lucky you won’t already be dead when this happens…. read more

I also posed the question to a few of the others at the Fine Art Photoblog. Neil (shown above as the first comment) answered the question here on the blog before I even had a chance to announce it to the whole group. So here are some additional thoughts from Andrew and Myself.

Andrew Gibson

For me, Fine Art Photography is something that is beautiful. Art is about creating objects of beauty, uplifting the spirit and celebrating the amazing world we live in. Sometimes, though, art is ugly or threatening and disturbing and brings things to our attention that we’d rather not know about or acknowledge. War photography is a great example of this. Take for example the photos of Zoriah, a photojournalist embedded in Iraq who Brian featured recently on this blog. Is it Fine Art? The intention of the photographer isn’t to make art, I’m sure, but to tell the story of the Iraq war from his perspective. But the photos have a strange beauty. It’s art, but it’s disturbing, in your face and deals with issues we’d rather not acknowledge or think about.

Brian Auer

I believe Fine Art Photography certainly falls within the bounds of the encompassing realm of Fine Art. To me, Fine Art Photography has to do more with mastery of the process than the actual photo. This process would include things like choosing the camera, capturing the image, processing, printing, etc. Since the process is typically a lengthy endeavor, the artist will usually form a strong emotional connection with the piece of art they have created. When others see that artwork, they might also connect with that photo in some way, but not necessarily in the same way as the artist. So can we label ourselves as Fine Art Photographers? Absolutely. Nobody knows your work and the process behind it better than you do. Whether or not your work is liked by others is an entirely different question.

Announcing 3 New Fine Art Photobloggers

Fine Art Photoblog

I must admit that I was a little unsure what to expect when I put out the call for portfolios for the addition of a few new photographers on the Fine Art Photoblog. I was pleasantly surprised to have 44 exceptional photographers submit portfolios of top quality and seriousness.

What I thought would be a simple selection process turned out to be a very difficult and mentally taxing turn of events. The seven of us at the photoblog plus one guest judge spent a good deal of time selecting and discussing these portfolios and the photographers behind them. So here’s the result of several weeks of work from 44 photographers and 8 judges.

A NOTE TO THE ARTISTS

I think I speak for all of us at the Fine Art Photoblog when I say that we’re blessed to have so many great photographers and artists take an interest in our venture. I was completely blown away by many of the portfolios and I knew that the process of choosing only a few would be the most difficult thing I’ve had to do in a long time. If we had the capacity to take on more than a few new photographers, we certainly would have. For those photographers who weren’t chosen in this round, in no way does it mean that your works aren’t “worthy” or “good enough”. For many of you, it was quite the contrary.

So if you’re bummed out that you didn’t make it to the final picks, don’t be. I hope that this process of creating and submitting a portfolio was at least an educational one. The ability to choose a limited number of photos for a specific topic is a seriously useful skill to have. I also hope that you all had the chance to look through the other portfolios, learn from each other, and maybe even make a few new friends. With that said, here we go…

PLEASE JOIN ME IN WELCOMING…

… the following three artists to the Fine Art Photoblog. I’m very excited to have them join the group and expand our body of work from here out.

Mathias Pastwa

MATHIAS PASTWA

Mathias displays a very strong sense of composition and use of brilliant colors to depict a variety of scenes. He’s best known for his very bold imagery of mechanical subjects, mixing strong shapes and colors to create a visual treat for your eyes. Mathias seems to have a good handle on street, urban, and abstract photography — not to mention his very noticeable and memorable artistic style.

Dawn LeBlanc

DAWN LEBLANC

Dawn has knack for simplifying complex objects and she displays an amazing control of light and shadow. Her photos are pleasing to view and there’s no question as to the focal point of her images. Plant and flower photography is such a popular subject, and thus often becomes cliche as a result. But Dawn brings her subjects to the next level and places her work outside of the realm of cliche imagery.

William Fawcett

WILLIAM FAWCETT

William exhibited outstanding panoramic landscapes in his portfolio, both natural and urban. The wide sweeping landscapes, big skies, and attention to detail in every corner of his photos certainly won the judges over. Although we already have a strong landscape representation on the photoblog, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to include William in the group, and we felt that his consistent quality in panoramic images would be a nice addition.

ABOUT THE JUDGES

First of all, we had a very special guest join us for the decision-making process behind the scenes.

Elizabeth Cecil is a photographer living on Martha’s Vineyard. She is devoted to the tradition of black and white printmaking as well as alternative processes. Elizabeth currently teaches darkroom courses through the Artist in Residence program on the Vineyard as well as summer classes at the Maine Media Workshops in Rockport Maine. She has an impressive collection of photos and an equally impressive history of experience in art photography. We are grateful to have her join us in the process of selecting new photographers for the photoblog. Thanks Elizabeth!

And now for “the rest of us”.

Andreas Manessinger

Andreas Manessinger a photographer working in Vienna, Austria who spends his weekends in Carinthia, Austria’s most southern, sunny province. Since autumn 2006 he has a photoblog where he posts one image per day, and that means shot, processed and posted at the same day. His work is mostly street photography when he is in Vienna, and landscapes and rural environments on weekends, but these are no hard rules. [personal website]

Andrew Gibson

Andrew Gibson is Andrew Gibson is a photographer who was born in the UK and graduated from the Blackpool & Fylde College with a BA (Hons) Photography in 1999. One region he’s been drawn back to time and time again is South America, in particular Argentina and the Andean regions of Boliva and Peru. It’s for this reason that he’s moved to Argentina to focus on photographing and writing about these countries. [personal website]

Joseph Szymanski

Joseph Szymanski is a photographer based in San Francisco, California. A native of Detroit, his interest in the photographic process began at a very young age. After secondary school he moved to San Francisco to attend college, studying art and photography formally for five years. Today the majority of his time is spent working on personal photographic projects, as well as several web projects with other photographers and designers. [personal website]

Cody Redmon

Cody Redmon is a native and current resident of Montana who fell in love with landscapes at an early age. Growing up in a rural area gave him the access to explore his interest and grow his techniques, while visiting some of the most beautiful areas of the United States’ northwest and southwest regions. As a photographer, his goal is to capture the beauty of a scene and present it in a manner which conveys emotion. He has a deep respect for the wilds and is pleased to present to you scenes and vistas from the back reaches of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and Utah. He maintains a personal blog of current works at Cody Redmon – Photoblog, and has additional signed and numbered, limited edition prints on his personal website, CodyRedmon.com. [personal website]

Neil Creek

Neil Creek is a visual person, with a keen affinity for beauty. He is driven to capture sights and emotions that move him, so that he can move others who see his photography. He has a thirst for knowledge, and is always looking to improve his skills and add new techniques to his repertoire. He is especially passionate about panoramic photography, macro photography and pushing the boundaries with experimental and abstract photography. As he pushes photography in an artistic direction, he also continually hones and refines his professional photographic skills, especially portrait, product and travel photography. His web site has many panoramas, and he is participating in Project 365 – a photo every day for a year – on his blog. [personal website]

David Ziser

David Ziser is a professional photographer from the metro Cincinnati area. He concentrates mostly on weddings and family portraits. To relax, he enjoys landscape and fine art photography as well, and puts quite a bit on energy into both when he has a bit of spare time on his hands. [personal website]

Brian Auer

Brian Auer is a photographer currently residing in the San Diego area. He’s been actively pursuing the art of photography since 2003, and his daily quest is to become a better photographer. The Fine Art Photoblog is Brian’s creation and he has selected some of the finest and most enthusiastic photographers to participate in this website. He also blogs about photography at the Epic Edits Weblog and shares his work at Flickr. [personal website]

OUR DECISION PROCESS

Due to the number of portfolios we had to deal with, the process of elimination was broken down into three parts: A narrowing of the field by way of voting, a discussion of our personal favorites, and a final selection via another voting process.

Andreas suggested a method for voting that would produce a combination of group favorites and personal favorites. We each chose 5 portfolios from the original list. We then assigned 1, 2, or 3 points to each of those portfolios in any way we wished. Tallying up these votes gave us the group favorites. In addition to assigning more points to the portfolios we liked more, we each also chose 1 of our 5 to be “nominated” for the final round of discussions — meaning that this portfolio would be included with the top voted portfolios no matter who else did or didn’t vote for that portfolio. It turned out that most of our nominees were in the top 5 or 10 anyways, but it gave each of us the assurance that our absolute favorite portfolio would be looked at a second time around.

Once we narrowed the field, we ended up with two photographers who stood out above the rest based on points assigned. This was actually a bit unexpected to us, and we hadn’t planned on the process being so easy. So rather than call it a day, we decided that we would take on three photographers rather than two because the remaining group of top-voted portfolios were way too good to pass up that easy. So we spent a few days discussing, arguing, and defending these remaining photographers. Some of us may have even changed our minds about our selections based on these discussions.

Once the discussions were tapering down, we wiped the slate clean and cast another round of votes for those remaining by voting for up to 5 photographers using the same points system as before. This time around we still had a few top runners battling for the first spot. By the end of the voting, one photographer was ahead by several points and it was agreed that this would be our third addition to the group.

QUOTING THE JUDGES

Here are a few random quotes from the judges as the discussions wore on. None of these are specific to any one portfolio entry, just some generalities here and there.

Holy crap… we’re up to 42 entries.Brian Auer

I’m impressed with how in line with each other we are, says a bit about us and the artist pool both. I’m happy to consider a 3rd member, it would cool to spring on some lucky winner.Cody Redmon

It is quite difficult to choose favourites from such a varied selection of work… In the end, I decided to look for a consistent style and vision amongst the portfolios, and also for signs that the person has an archive of photos that they can fall back on when they’re not producing new work. I think this last point’s important because it’s hard to post a photo a week, and harder still to post a good photo.Andrew Gibson

When do we start the next round?Joseph Szymanski

We all have our various tastes, likes ,and dislikes. I think that is what makes it kind of fun – what did they see in his work? This guy is the clear winner, etc, etc. You know, I believe the process nearly always works – I mean that as positive remark.David Ziser

A BIG THANK YOU TO EVERYONE

I’m so grateful to everyone involved with this whole thing… the artists who submitted portfolios, the visitors who showed an interest, and the great judges who did a superb job at selecting the new photographers. This was truly a group effort, and we’re lucky to be a part of such an outstanding community.

You can all expect to see some great new work from Mathias, Dawn, and William appearing on the Fine Art Photoblog very soon.

New Fine Art Photobloggers… Coming Soon

For the last several weeks, current members of the Fine Art Photoblog plus one special guest have been voting, discussing, voting again, picking, and choosing from a pool of 44 portfolios in search of a few new artists. The process has admittedly taken longer than anticipated due to the large number of high quality portfolios and in part due to the international nature of our team (we’re all on wildly different time zones).

The selected photographers will be announced no later than Monday, June 30. The Fine Art Photoblog team is currently preparing the announcements and a press release so that our new additions can get the welcome they deserve. Rather than just make a quick announcement about the new photographers, we’d like to make a lot of noise and get these folks off to a running start.

To those anticipating the final results of this whole thing, we appreciate your ongoing patience and support.

What is Fine Art Photography?

The poll this week will be another open-ended question rather than a click-and-vote. The last time I ran one like this, we had some awesome answers and I highlighted them in a follow-up post the next week. So we’ll do the same here.

The question this week spawns from my own involvement with fine art photography. I find photography in general to be a highly subjective topic — what’s good, what sucks, what works, and what doesn’t is typically a matter of taste amongst other things. Fine Art Photography tends to be even more subjective since it’s a narrow slice of photography as an artistic medium.

So, What is Fine Art Photography?

How would you define it? What makes a photo Fine Art rather than something else? Can photographers really call themselves Fine Art Photographers? And what conditions would make it feasible for a photographer to include themselves in this category? Offer up your thoughts, take the discussion where you wish, and I’ll pick out some of the more insightful comments for an upcoming featured article.

And since we’re on the topic of insightful polls, be sure to check out the results and comments from last week asking the question “Do You Take Photos or Make Photos?” It looks like a majority “take photos” rather than “make photos”, and a good portion also says they “do both”. Several commentators also hit on the topic of what these terms really mean, so be sure to check that out.

Simply Religious Print for Sale on eBay

Simply Religious on eBay

I’ll be experimenting with alternate methods of selling prints over the next few months. One method I’ll be pursuing is via eBay. I’ve started by listing one of my photos for sale as a signed and limited edition print. I’ll be adding new items every week or so, and after a few months I’ll share what I’ve learned.

In the meantime, if you’re interested in acquiring a print, check out my latest offering. I’ve started the listing at $470, which is lower than what I would typically ask. I’m offering this particular print at any size up to 36 inches, signed, and limited to 30. So if you want it, get on it!

Simply Religious on eBay

Top Photos From 43 Portfolios

On May 19, I announced that the Fine Art Photoblog was accepting portfolios to fill two new spots. In just two weeks, we had 43 outstanding portfolios come through: a few familiar names, and many new ones. This was a larger response than I had expected, and I have to admit that I’m wishing there were fewer portfolios to review!

Now the seven of us currently involved with the photoblog have the daunting task of selecting only two artists to potentially join us. We’ll be going through rounds of narrowing the field, defending our favorites, and coming to agreements. We take this task very seriously and it’s not something we’re prepared to rush in any way. So if you are one of the 43 who submitted a portfolio, please be patient while we work through this.

In the meantime, I wanted everybody to get some of the spotlight because I found this group of portfolios to be particularly inspiring. I’ve selected one photo (my own personal favorite) from each portfolio to be displayed as a sample. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. The display order is based on the order that the portfolios were received.

The photos below are the sole property of the artist. They maintain fully copyright to their images, so please don’t use them without permission.

UPDATE: Aw crud… it turns out we had 44 portfolio entries. One from Dawn Armfield didn’t go through with the entry form. Sorry Dawn! We got you in there now.

Niels Henriksen

Niels Henriksen

Joel Witmeyer

Joel Witmeyer

Daniel Hellerman

Daniel Hellerman

Cesar Tardaguila

Cesar Tardaguila

William Fawcett

William Fawcett

Chica

Chica

Stuart Murdoch

Stuart Murdoch

Martin Joergensen

Martin Joergensen

Boris Taratutin

Boris Taratutin

John P Sercel

John P Sercel

Gilbert Maker

Gilbert Maker

Broderick Smylie

Broderick Smylie

Mathias Pastwa

Mathias Pastwa

Bob

Bob

Mike Pearce

Mike Pearce

Scott Ward

Scott Ward

Sebastien Noir

Sebastien Noir

Ed Zawadzki

Ed Zawadzki

Damien Franco

Damien Franco

Alexander Artemenko

Alexander Artemenko

Ariel Diacovetzky

Ariel Diacovetzky

Gunjan Karun

Gunjan Karun

Steve Berk

Steve Berk

Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Kevin Flint

Kevin Flint

Amanda Loomis

Amanda Loomis

Allison Jacobsen

Allison Jacobsen

Craig Bell

Craig Bell

Javiy

Javiy

Kelly Garnett

Kelly Garnett

Aaron Boot

Aaron Boot

Dawn LeBlanc

Dawn LeBlanc

Christian James

Christian James

Ryan Pennington

Ryan Pennington

Blake J. Nolan

Blake J Nolan

William Rugen

William Rugen

Karola Riegler

Karola Riegler

Melissa Beach

Melissa Beach

Jeremy Brooks

Jeremy Brooks

Gregor Winter

Gregor Winter

W. D. Naismith

W D Naismith

Zachary Cobb

Zachary Cobb

Vahid

Vahid

Dawn Armfield

Dawn Armfield

I hope you all enjoy taking a look at these photos and I encourage you to browse through the portfolios.

Last Call for Fine Art Photoblog Portfolios

The deadline for portfolio entries is end of day June 2 (that’s today!). If you’re interested in becoming a part of the Fine Art Photoblog, get some photos together quick and submit the link with the form provided on the official announcement page. And don’t forget to check out some of the portfolios already entered — we’ve got over 30 artists in the mix and a good deal of them are very good.

Enter Your Fine Art Portfolio