Tag Archives: interview

Link Roundup 07-02-2010

Link Roundup 06-27-2010

Link Roundup 06-14-2010

I just realized that it’s been a few weeks since I posted some links! So here are a few that I have in my list… I’ve got more, but I don’t like posting more than 10-15 links at a time.

Elliott Erwitt Answers My Questions

We recently started a discussion around the question “Why is Street Photography Dominated by Black and White?” and we had some great comments from the readers. Shortly thereafter, I got an email from the folks at TeNeues with regard to the “Elliot Erwitt Photo Caption Contest” I had talked about. They said that they would be interviewing Elliott the next day and wanted to know if I had any questions for him.

Well… I thought that it would be cool to have a master of street photography weigh in on the conversation. So I sent the “Why is street photography dominated by black and white?” question along with “Do you ever get anxious taking pictures of people in public?” Both questions were answered in their short interview — very cool! Here’s a link to the video that they posted on FaceBook.

Hop over there and check it out — they have a pretty good set of questions, and Elliott answers them in his usual humorous manner.

Link Roundup 05-17-2010

Link Roundup 01-10-2009

A few selected links from this week…

  • Ambrotype Photography
    Photocritic
    If you think film photography is a pain-in-the-butt, check out this stuff! I think I found my next personal challenge!
  • How to Photograph a Convention
    digital Photography School
    Conventions can be a great place to photograph some interesting characters — here’s a good set of tips for doing just that!
  • Creativity Ideas for Photographers
    My Camera World
    We all hit creativity blocks from time to time. Here are some ideas for getting past those blocks and getting back on track.
  • Four compact photo printers under $150
    Photodoto
    Printing is becoming a long lost art among photographers. So check out these four (inexpensive) photo printers if you want to actually see some photos on paper.
  • Playing With Fire – How to Photograph Fire
    digital Photography School
    Fire can be a tricky subject in photography. Here are a few good tips for getting better fire photos in a variety of situations.
  • Chase Jarvis’ 5 Tips for Exceptional Photographs
    silberstudios.tv
    An Interview with Chase Jarvis as he gives out his 5 tips for exceptional photographs.
  • “Share-a-Link” Saturday
    LeggNet’s Digital Capture
    Rich opened up the floodgates for people to leave comments with links to their favorite photography sites. Check out the list, and leave a few of your own favorites!
  • City of Lost Carts
    Doc Challenge
    An interesting documentary on a photographer who primarily photographed a very specific subject for an extended period of time.

The Bill of Rights for Photography Competitions

In the 24th episode of EXIF and Beyond, Jim Goldstein talks with Nick Dunmur of Pro-Imaging.org about the Bill of Rights for Photography Competitions.

This is a document that outlines the conditions for photographic competition organisers and sponsors to be guided by when constructing terms and conditions for their competitions. With so many online photography competitions out there, photographers sometimes forget to read the fine print. This has resulted in several contest organizers getting away with the “Rights Grab”, leaving photographers in a cloud of confusion when they realize they’ve given away the rights to their work.

If you’ve ever considered entering your photos in a photography competition, this interview is certainly worth a listen.

EXIF AND BEYOND: NICK DUNMUR OF PRO-IMAGING.ORG
BILL OF RIGHTS FOR PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITIONS

PhotoNetCast Speaks with Adobe on Lightroom

PhotoNetCast

Episode #18 of the PhotoNetCast is now available for your listening pleasure. In this one, we talk with Tom Hogarty — an Adobe product manager for Lightroom. We talk to him about all kinds of things regarding the popular software, and he gives us some good insights to the “behind the scenes” work that goes into such software.

And as a special feature, Adobe gave us one copy of Lightroom to give away to our listeners! That’s a $300 piece of software! If you want a chance at the software, you’ve got until December 17th to enter the raffle.

You have two ways of entering: leave a comment (1 entry) or write a blog post (2 entries). In either case, we’d like to hear how Lightroom would change your digital photography workflow. Pretty easy if you ask me!

VISIT PHOTONETCAST 18 FOR MORE INFO

Link Roundup 11-08-2008

  • Photographing the desert night with Troy Paiva
    PhotoNetCast
    In this episode of PhotoNetCast we interview Troy Paiva, a well-established night photographer and urban explorer. The guy is such a riot, this is definitely worth a listen.
  • Studying Light in Photography
    Beyond Megapixels
    An overview of the various aspects of light as it pertains to photography — quantity, temperature, direction, and quality.
  • Goodbye George W. Bush!
    ZORIAH
    A glimpse into the inner thoughts of soldiers, written on the walls of latrines.
  • How to Improve Your Wedding Photography
    digital Photography School
    A few simple tips to help improve your wedding photography game… if that’s your thing.
  • 5 Surprising Places to Sell your Photos
    Photopreneur
    If you’re trying to sell your photos, here are a few venues you might want to check out.
  • How to Photograph a Conference – 10 Tips
    digital Photography School
    If you ever attend a conference and you have the opportunity to bring your camera, here are some killer tips for getting the most out of the experience.
  • Image Optimization For The Web, Part I
    Digital Photo Pro
    A quick rundown of some basic things you should be thinking about when producing images for web display.
  • How to Shoot Super Macro Photos
    digital Photography School
    Here’s an old trick to getting WAY beyond 1:1 with your macro photography. I’ve tried this particular setup, and it does work, but it certainly takes some patience.
  • Basic Travel Photography
    Photodoto
    Traveling to new places can present may great opportunities for photos — just don’t fall into the typical “tourist” mode! Here are some tips to keep your travel photos fresh and original.

Book Review: The Life of a Photograph

The folks at National Geographic approached me about reviewing an upcoming book from master photographer Sam Abell. The book, The Life of a Photograph, draws on 40 years of fieldwork from Sam and presents readers with a unique view of his work and the life of his photographs. I was also given the great pleasure of speaking with Sam on various topics surrounding his book and photography in general (and that alone would constitute a blog post). So this article is a bit of a mix between a book review and an interview.

The Life of a Photograph can be purchased directly from National Geographic or through Amazon.com.

DISCLAIMER: This is NOT a paid review, nor has it been reviewed or edited by the book’s author or publisher. The book was sent to me by the publisher free of charge. I am in no way affiliated with the book or the publisher of the book.

ABOUT THE BOOK

The Life of a Photograph is a collection of work from Sam Abell’s experience in the field as a National Geographic photographer. But the book isn’t about National Geographic or the stories covered by the photos — it’s about Sam Abell, his photos, and how they’ve taken on a life of their own. Sam has long been thought of as one of the most artistic photographers working for National Geographic, and this book is certainly filled with artistic photos — some having been previously published by National Geographic, and some being published for the first time ever.

The book is a hearty 208 pages filled with approximately 200 color photos (except for one). Each of the 11 chapters contains thoughts and anecdotes from Sam as he attempts to answer the question “What gives a photograph a life?” Sam has identified photos that have lasted through time and talks about the reason for this. The book was carefully designed by Sam and his editor to show each photo in a most truthful manner. No images were cropped or otherwise post-processed (except to preserve the image, not fix it). The photos are given plenty of room to be enjoyed, and no image bleeds up to the edge of the page or crosses the gutter of the book. The presentation of his work was of the utmost importance to Sam during the creation of this book.

One unique aspect of the book that stands out is the “two views” presentation seen on many of the pages within. Often times, a particular scene is photographed from multiple perspectives and the publication editors (such as those from National Geographic) have the task of choosing one that works best. The other photos are never seen by readers. Sam brings these photos back into the picture and opens up a whole new aspect of his work by showing “two views” from the same scene. This method of presentation has the effect of slowing down the reader because the visual relationship introduced. It also puts the reader in the shoes of the photographer and the magazine editor. All in all, the “two views” presentation is an amazing part of this book.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sam Abell began his journey into photography during his childhood mainly thanks to his Father, Thad S. Abell. One of his first life-changing experiences was brought on by a photo Sam took of his Dad with his Dad’s Rollei in 1960. The photo went on to win a prize in a national contest in 1961, and this experience helped to shape Sam’s future. He also mentions that one of his major life-changing experiences was reading a simple book on the Great Depression by Dorothea Lange in the mid-1960′s. He was inspired by Lange’s ability to document the world in an artistic fashion, and Sam’s own work through his career has followed the same example.

Sam began his career with National Geographic in 1967, and has since contributed nearly 40 years of work in the field. Along the way, Sam has published several books of his own (The Photographic Life, Stay This Moment, and Seeing Gardens) in addition to several best-selling National Geographic publications (Lewis & Clark: Voyage of Discovery and The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation: From the Louisiana Purchase to Today).

Today, Sam has turned more of his attention to teaching and educating via seminars across the country. He’s also spending a great deal of time editing past photos from his body of work for use in possible future publications. But he certainly hasn’t put down the camera, and he still enjoys taking on side projects in the field and photographing for his personal diary using black & white film (which is the medium that is most dear to this lifelong photographer).

Though my interview with Sam Abell was quite informal, I learned a great deal from this man in just one hour. For a more formal interview with Sam, visit Photo District News for a verbatim discussion.

MY FINAL THOUGHTS

Some books are flipped through, where the reader glances at the photos within. Others demand to be read and appreciated, but can still be knocked out in a single sitting. While few photography books require a detailed inspection and re-inspection over many sittings, The Life of a Photograph is definitely one of them.

I do believe that every photographer out there can learn much from this book while being inspired by its imagery. I would even go so far as to say that it’s changed the way I look at photos. Sam’s style is incredibly quiet and simple (just like his approach to photography). Upon first glance, the photos don’t appear to be incredibly special — but then they immediately draw you into them and hit you with a profound sense of interest and meaning.

I leave you with Sam’s favorite quote from the book, as he talks about that 1960 photograph of his father:What I no longer remember is the day itself. It was in color wasn’t it? And the snow I knelt on to compose the picture in my dad’s Rollei — wasn’t it cold or wet or both? Surely we talked afterward — about trains or photography or what we’d do next. But all that has vanished. In its place is this photograph. The photograph is what I remember.

The Life of a Photograph can be purchased directly from National Geographic or through Amazon.com.