Tag Archives: iso

Link Roundup 05-02-2009

Once again, it’s been a few weeks since the last set of links. Here are some of the more interesting ones I’ve come across.

  • HDR Photography
    Travel Photography
    PhotoNetCast
    In episode 27 of PhotoNetCast, we talk with Dave Wilson about HDR photography. This includes all the ins and outs of capturing and processing the images. And if you’re going to be traveling in the near or distant future, be sure to listen to episode 28 where we discuss the many aspects of taking your camera gear to new locations.
  • Photojournalist: G.M.B. Akash — Child Labor
    Child Labor – Part Two
    Zoriah.net
    Amazing set of photos from Bangladesh on the subject of child labor — sad, but definitely worth a look.
  • Kenya – Child Poverty
    Kenya – Child Poverty – Part Two
    Zoriah.net
    Another great set of photos from Zoriah as he explores child poverty in Kenya.
  • Photography 101.7 – ISO
    digital Photography School
    If you’ve ever been confused or curious about the term “ISO”, this article lays out all the basics for you.
  • The Lazy Rule of Thirds
    Jake Garn
    Jake Garn gives a great discussion on the rule of thirds and where it really comes from — the golden mean. He also shows some amazing examples of how the golden mean fits into his own compositions.
  • the DIY 30 second light tent
    f/1.0
    Ever need a light tent for a product shoot, but didn’t have one handy? Here’s a quick DIY alternative to the traditional piece of equipment.
  • 10 Tips When Using dSLRs in High Humidity
    JMG-Galleries
    Whether you live in a high humidity climate or you’re just visiting one, here are some essential tips for keeping your equipment working in these harsh conditions.
  • 22 Professional Photoshop Image Enhancing Tutorials
    Six Revisions
    For you Photoshop enthusiasts, here’s a good little list of tutorials and techniques for enhancing your photos.

Link Roundup 08-30-2008

Good stuff all around, with lots of exciting news this week.

  • Before I Die I Want To…
    A Polaroid Project
    What an amazing project — Polaroid photos of people from all over the place, and they write down what they want to do before they die on the Polaroid. Entertaining and inspirational.
  • RAW vs. JPEG: Part 1 – What are they?
    RAW vs. JPEG: Part 2 – Pros and Cons
    Hyperphocal
    A discussion of the merits of both raw and jpeg formats, giving you a better ability to choose which format is right for you. Part 2 talks about the pros and cons of each format and why you might choose one over the other.
  • Light Modifiers 101
    Beyond Megapixels
    Barn door, cookie, flag, gel, gobo, grid, softbox, snoot, and umbrella — all lighting equipment modifiers, and all explained in this article.
  • Moving Toward Manual Settings: Understanding ISO (a beginner’s guide)
    digital Photography School
    A basic introductory guide to ISO settings and how they affect your photos.
  • How to Split Tone a Photo in 30 Seconds or Less
    Andrew S Gibson
    Photoshop CS does away with messy darkroom chemicals and lets you split tone black & white prints with just a few clicks of the mouse.
  • I Started a $2 Portraits Group on Flickr
    Thomas Hawk’s Digital Connection
    Thomas Hawk has been pursuing a project where he offers people asking for money $2 in exchange for their portrait. Now he’s even started a Flickr group so others can join him.
  • Advance Testing the Nikon D90
    Chase Jarvis
    Chase Jarvis runs us through the features of the new Nikon D90 dSLR camera. He’s got a great video and a bunch of stuff to say about this camera.

Use ISO AUTO… Why Not?

ISO AUTO

I think I’ve gone through full-cycle with my preference for ISO settings on my camera. As a newbie, I primarily had the camera set to ISO AUTO because… well, it was just easier. As my skill level increased, so did my utilization of the camera controls. For some time now, I’ve been setting the ISO value manually while shooting in aperture priority mode. Manually keeping your ISO as low as possible is a great way to ensure high quality images, and I’m not disputing that it’s totally necessary with certain types of shooting.

But very recently, I went back to shooting ISO AUTO to evaluate the trade-offs between convenience and quality. What I found was that my camera limits the ISO value to 400 or lower when in AUTO mode. A comparison of an image shot with my camera at ISO 400 versus ISO 100 tells me that there are very subtle differences in quality, sometimes unrecognizable (especially with black and white conversions). But convenience alone isn’t the real reason I’ve gone back to ISO AUTO.

The camera sets itself to the lowest possible ISO value based on the lighting conditions — so with bright scenes, I’m still shooting at ISO 100. I also found that the camera won’t let the shutter speed fall below 1/60 seconds as long as it has enough room to bump the ISO value up to the next level. This is nice because it keeps me out of that 1/15 to 1/45 area, which most of us would still shoot at but is very prone to producing soft images. Another neat thing about ISO AUTO is that the camera will set the ISO value to things other than 100, 200, or 400. I noticed some of my low-light shots coming out at ISO 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, and 400 — so it’s actually giving me a finer control over the exposure.

What do you guys think? Is ISO AUTO just for newbies, or is it actually useful for the skilled photographer too? I’m curious to hear how other cameras deal with ISO AUTO, so if you’ve messed around with it drop some insights into the comments.

Link Roundup 12-29-2007

Before we get to the list, be sure to check out my super-cool guest-post on “Going with the Grain” over at ADIDAP (we swapped posts for Christmas). I’ve always liked grainy photos, so I put together a little information on the subject and picked out some CC photos to help make my point.

7 Bad Habits of Digital Photographers

This is a special guest-post from a new friend of mine, Antoine Khater. Check the bottom of this post for his bio, and don’t forget to visit his photography blog!

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I have been taking pictures seriously for about 5 years and been around major photography forums for about the same time. Here are, compiled in one post, the 7 bad habits of digital photographers…

1. NOT DOUBLE CHECKING YOUR GEAR BAG

It never happened to you? It sure did to me! I can’t remember how many times I went shooting just to notice later on that I forgot the CF cards at home. Just a few months ago my wife and I took a photography trip to Croatia and I totally forgot to pack the battery charger with me! So if you are as clumsy as I am, maybe you should trust your wife in packing things up for you.

2. NOT DOUBLE CHECKING ISO SETTINGS

This is surely one of the most common post subjects you will find if you linger long enough in Digital Photography forums. We are all somehow used to reaching for our ISO settings button just when we need to go “higher” and we too often take it for granted that the camera is set to the “correct” one every time we take it from the bag. And that is why so many people are asking for the ISO setting to be displayed in the viewfinder, until then and to avoid surprises, good or bad, make sure to double check that ISO setting every time you turn your camera on.

3. I’LL GET THIS STRAIGHT LATER

Let me first say that I have nothing against Photoshop or any other kind of photo retouching I even pointed out some times ago an easy way to correct tilted pictures in the digital dark room. However I believe that if you can get it right on the field it is better. So if you have the bad habit of tilting your pictures, here are 6 tips that will hep you get them straight next time.

4. I SHOOT RAW, I DON’T CARE ABOUT EXPOSURE

RAW is wonderful tool and gives us, photographers, a great deal of flexibility during post processing. The ability to tweak the exposure in RAW should be used ONLY within limits — blown highlights and and underexposed shadows can’t be recovered. So make sure to always get the exposure right.

5. DELETING PICTURES TOO FAST

Well I’m writing this specially for myself! I delete pictures faster than I take them sometimes… Here is a recent article from LightChasers explaining why we should never be doing this.

6. BETTER BODY INSTEAD OF BETTER LENS

I guess it is just a human nature but every time a new camera is released we have all tendency to become green with envy and deep down we should know that we would be much better investing in a better lens than in a better camera.

7. BLAMING THE MATERIAL

And, of course, on the TOP of the list “Blaming the material”! When we do not manage of getting a decent picture we go like “AH if only I had that lens!” but if someone looks at a nice pictures of ours and says “Wow you should have a nice camera!!!” We go crazy… Anyway, remember folks, it is always the photographer never the Camera.

Again, I’d like to thank Antoine for this wonderful guest-post he’s written for us, and remember to check out his website: All Day I Dream About Photography.
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