Tag Archives: light

Link Roundup 09-01-2010

Finally starting to clear out my feed reader and catching up on these link posts. I have about 10 or 15 more in the hopper, but I’ll save them for another day.

Link Roundup 05-15-2010

Link Roundup 03-31-2010

I’m trying something new with the link roundups, so bear with me while I get it all figured out. This post is testing the Postalicious plugin — it basically taps into my Delicious stream and generates a link roundup based on a set of parameters. I bookmark a lot of stuff anyway, but since separating out my Twitter accounts, I’ve been much more active (and collecting many more bookmarks).

Like I said, I’m still figuring out how I want to do all this. If it goes as I hope, I’ll be sharing fewer links more often with less work.

20 Resources That Will Get You Lit

0233 - Domo Lightbulb
Creative Commons License photo credit: Aaronth

Lighting… It’s a complicated mixture of knowledge, equipment, and magic. You shouldn’t attempt it unless you’re a trained professional with lots of money and a big studio of your own. In addition, you’ll need to memorize thousands of rules and lighting setups in order for your photos to look decent.

Oh wait… forget what I just said. That’s just how it appears before you take the time to learn it.

[tweetmeme]I have to admit that I’m just starting that learning process, and I wanted to share some great resources recently suggested by the readers of Epic Edits. I’ve split up the links into lighting diagrams, lighting tutorials, lighting websites, and lighting courses/workshops. Start clicking!

LIGHTING DIAGRAMS

LIGHTING DIAGRAMS FROM JAKE GARN PHOTOGRAPHY
4 lighting diagrams and sample shots from a fashion photographer.

EXPLAINED LIGHTING SCHEMES FROM FOTOPUNTO.COM
16 simple lighting setups with simple explanations.

SELF PORTRAITS AND LIGHTING DIAGRAMS FROM KRIS MITCHELL
Documentation of a Project 52, including 11 lighting diagrams (and counting).

LIGHTING TUTORIALS

PORTRAIT LIGHTING SET-UPS FROM PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 101
Five of the most basic portrait lighting techniques.

PORTRAIT LIGHTING CHEAT SHEET CARD FROM DIYPHOTOGRAPHY.NET
A great concept that shows a full spectrum of effects by moving a single light.

VISUALIZING STUDIO LIGHTING FROM PHOTOCRITIC
An exploration of simple lighting to achieve different effects on the same subject.

PROPHOTOLIFE YOUTUBE CHANNEL
A collection of 33 video tutorials, mostly having to do with lighting techniques.

SNAPFACTORY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
This playlist titled “Digital Photography 1 on 1″ has great lighting Q&A with examples.

MOMENTOUS BREAKDOWN! FROM YOUR PHOTO TIPS
A good example of the “less is more” motto — check out the photo and diagram!

HOW TO LIGHT ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING – THE DISCERNING PHOTOGRAPHER
An intuitive approach to photographic lighting — start with one!

LIGHTING WEBSITES

STROBIST
Learning how to use off-camera flash with your dSLR.

LIGHTING ESSENTIALS FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
Lighting, Photography, Fashion and Editorial Portraiture on Location and In Studio.

ZARIAS.COM
The blog of editorial photographer Zack Arias

PIXSYLATED
Honestly Biased Insights on Photography by Syl Arena.

PROPHOTORESOURCE.COM
Articles by Chris Grey dealing with lighting techniques and equipment.

STEFAN TELL
Many example photos and lighting diagrams for portraits.

RICHARD AVEDON
Ok… so this one isn’t really a lighting resource, but the photos are awesome to study!

WORKSHOPS AND TRAINING COURSES

THE ONELIGHT WORKSHOP BY ZACK ARIAS
A nuts and bolts type of workshop — Off Camera. Manual Mode. Old School.

LIGHTING ESSENTIALS WORKSHOPS
Learn to light without spending a fortune.

KELBY TRAINING
Online training for photographers — check out the stuff by McNally and Ziser.

[tweetmeme]Special thanks to Nathan Nontell, William Beem, Kris Mitchell, Steve, Shawn, Tomas Webb, Janne, Kunal Daswani, udi, Don Winkler, Mike Blanchard, Stefan Tell, Damien Franco, Jay, and Andrew Boyd for commenting on my previous post asking for lighting resources. You guys are awesome.

Link Roundup 11-22-2009

Link Roundup 05-02-2009

Once again, it’s been a few weeks since the last set of links. Here are some of the more interesting ones I’ve come across.

  • HDR Photography
    Travel Photography
    PhotoNetCast
    In episode 27 of PhotoNetCast, we talk with Dave Wilson about HDR photography. This includes all the ins and outs of capturing and processing the images. And if you’re going to be traveling in the near or distant future, be sure to listen to episode 28 where we discuss the many aspects of taking your camera gear to new locations.
  • Photojournalist: G.M.B. Akash — Child Labor
    Child Labor – Part Two
    Zoriah.net
    Amazing set of photos from Bangladesh on the subject of child labor — sad, but definitely worth a look.
  • Kenya – Child Poverty
    Kenya – Child Poverty – Part Two
    Zoriah.net
    Another great set of photos from Zoriah as he explores child poverty in Kenya.
  • Photography 101.7 – ISO
    digital Photography School
    If you’ve ever been confused or curious about the term “ISO”, this article lays out all the basics for you.
  • The Lazy Rule of Thirds
    Jake Garn
    Jake Garn gives a great discussion on the rule of thirds and where it really comes from — the golden mean. He also shows some amazing examples of how the golden mean fits into his own compositions.
  • the DIY 30 second light tent
    f/1.0
    Ever need a light tent for a product shoot, but didn’t have one handy? Here’s a quick DIY alternative to the traditional piece of equipment.
  • 10 Tips When Using dSLRs in High Humidity
    JMG-Galleries
    Whether you live in a high humidity climate or you’re just visiting one, here are some essential tips for keeping your equipment working in these harsh conditions.
  • 22 Professional Photoshop Image Enhancing Tutorials
    Six Revisions
    For you Photoshop enthusiasts, here’s a good little list of tutorials and techniques for enhancing your photos.

Link Roundup 11-08-2008

  • Photographing the desert night with Troy Paiva
    PhotoNetCast
    In this episode of PhotoNetCast we interview Troy Paiva, a well-established night photographer and urban explorer. The guy is such a riot, this is definitely worth a listen.
  • Studying Light in Photography
    Beyond Megapixels
    An overview of the various aspects of light as it pertains to photography — quantity, temperature, direction, and quality.
  • Goodbye George W. Bush!
    ZORIAH
    A glimpse into the inner thoughts of soldiers, written on the walls of latrines.
  • How to Improve Your Wedding Photography
    digital Photography School
    A few simple tips to help improve your wedding photography game… if that’s your thing.
  • 5 Surprising Places to Sell your Photos
    Photopreneur
    If you’re trying to sell your photos, here are a few venues you might want to check out.
  • How to Photograph a Conference – 10 Tips
    digital Photography School
    If you ever attend a conference and you have the opportunity to bring your camera, here are some killer tips for getting the most out of the experience.
  • Image Optimization For The Web, Part I
    Digital Photo Pro
    A quick rundown of some basic things you should be thinking about when producing images for web display.
  • How to Shoot Super Macro Photos
    digital Photography School
    Here’s an old trick to getting WAY beyond 1:1 with your macro photography. I’ve tried this particular setup, and it does work, but it certainly takes some patience.
  • Basic Travel Photography
    Photodoto
    Traveling to new places can present may great opportunities for photos — just don’t fall into the typical “tourist” mode! Here are some tips to keep your travel photos fresh and original.

Link Roundup 09-13-2008

A lot of interesting stuff happening this week in the world of photography.

Link Roundup 08-30-2008

Good stuff all around, with lots of exciting news this week.

  • Before I Die I Want To…
    A Polaroid Project
    What an amazing project — Polaroid photos of people from all over the place, and they write down what they want to do before they die on the Polaroid. Entertaining and inspirational.
  • RAW vs. JPEG: Part 1 – What are they?
    RAW vs. JPEG: Part 2 – Pros and Cons
    Hyperphocal
    A discussion of the merits of both raw and jpeg formats, giving you a better ability to choose which format is right for you. Part 2 talks about the pros and cons of each format and why you might choose one over the other.
  • Light Modifiers 101
    Beyond Megapixels
    Barn door, cookie, flag, gel, gobo, grid, softbox, snoot, and umbrella — all lighting equipment modifiers, and all explained in this article.
  • Moving Toward Manual Settings: Understanding ISO (a beginner’s guide)
    digital Photography School
    A basic introductory guide to ISO settings and how they affect your photos.
  • How to Split Tone a Photo in 30 Seconds or Less
    Andrew S Gibson
    Photoshop CS does away with messy darkroom chemicals and lets you split tone black & white prints with just a few clicks of the mouse.
  • I Started a $2 Portraits Group on Flickr
    Thomas Hawk’s Digital Connection
    Thomas Hawk has been pursuing a project where he offers people asking for money $2 in exchange for their portrait. Now he’s even started a Flickr group so others can join him.
  • Advance Testing the Nikon D90
    Chase Jarvis
    Chase Jarvis runs us through the features of the new Nikon D90 dSLR camera. He’s got a great video and a bunch of stuff to say about this camera.

Challenge Yourself: Shoot in Harsh Sunlight

Ice Cold

I can’t count how many times I’ve heard the old saying about the “magic hour” and “waiting for the light to be right”. Pah… if you want to get out and shoot, then get out and shoot. Don’t wait for the evening light or an overcast day. Harsh direct sunlight may be a little more difficult to deal with, but it has a few merits too. I actually prefer to shoot in the afternoon sun because it produces such a drastically different result than “soft light” situations.

One big reason photographers (particularly those using digital cameras) like to avoid direct sunlight is because of the limited dynamic range of the sensor. If the light is too harsh, you’ll end up clipping your shadows or highlights (or both). We’ve been trained to believe that clipping is a terrible thing and it will ruin your photo. Not true… you just have to be more careful about controlling the clipping and force the camera to produce what you want it to.

Other reasons people whine about direct sunlight shooting include: shadows, too much light for the sensor, lens flare, it’s hot, it hurts their eyes, it’s their nap time, blah, blah, blah, etc., etc.

The Lifeguard

So, seriously, don’t be bummed out next time you find yourself equipped with a camera and faced with some bright light. Here are a few pointers for shooting in harsh sunlight situations:

  • If you’re on digital, expose for the highlights and let the shadows fall out.
  • Seek out subjects that produce interesting shadows, or even make the shadows the subject.
  • Check your histogram often and make sure the camera is giving you what you want.
  • Use your lens hood to avoid excess flares and glares.
  • Don’t shoot directly at the sun with a digital camera; it’ll look stupid, plus your sensor doesn’t like it.
  • Process the photos as black & white; high contrast tends to look better without color.
  • Your f/1.4 lens is useless, so don’t worry about bringing fast glass.
  • Use shutter priority and max it out; misused aperture priority can cause you to exceed the limits of your shutter and blow out all your photos.
  • Shoot b/w film; it has a higher dynamic range and you can get some really low ISO films (like ISO 50, 25, 12, etc. – can your digital camera do that? I’ve always wondered why ISO 100 was the lower limit…).
  • Break the rules; including the ones you see on this page.

The Place to Be Cruisers