Tag Archives: photography project

Which Photo Shall We Use for the Project?

As mentioned a few weeks back, we’re ramping-up for another project here on Epic Edits. To recap, we’ll be doing another “Edit my Photo” project, but with one of YOUR photos rather than one of mine. The first stage of the project was to submit candidates for the photo to be used. We didn’t have a huge turnout, but we did have a few people submit images.

So now we’re in “stage 2″ of the project where we vote on the image to be used — just ONE. I’ll leave it up to you guys which photo you want to work with for the final stage of the project. Here are the 6 candidates, and there’s a poll below them where you can cast your vote. And of course, a big thanks to the contributing photographers (linked via their photo).

1.
Photo by John Huson

2.
Photo by Thias

3.
Photo by Pat R

4.
Photo by Robert

5.
Photo by TikiPundit

6.
Photo by Bob Simmons

The above images are all available at high resolution, and most of them are in raw format. So pick one that looks like it would be fun to work with and we’ll start the photo editing soon enough!

{democracy:63}

How To Participate in Photography Projects

weekend07_04.jpg
Creative Commons License photo credit: smallritual

Photography projects are a great way to improve your skills and expand your creativity (plus they’re fun). These projects can take many forms and have many different requirements for participation. It seems like everywhere you look, there are group projects being hosted by bloggers, forums, and other online clubs.

Online projects can be vastly different from one another, but they all have one thing in common: you need to publish something. Sometimes the host will publish for you, and sometimes they require you to find your own avenue for publication. If you have your own blog or website, it’s pretty easy to meet the publication requirements. But if you don’t have your own site, things can be a little more difficult.

This article will show you a few of the methods you can use for self-publication when it comes to these projects — even some free ones. We’ll also take a look at some general points to remember when participating in projects. So if you’ve been holding back from participating in online photography projects, pay attention and take notes.

HOW TO BE A GOOD PLAYER

First and foremost, you need to be sure that you read the project requirements and rules very thoroughly. If you don’t follow the guidelines set by the project host, you’ll run the risk of disqualifying yourself from the project or having to do it over again the right way. Hosts set the rules to ensure that participants produce similar project entries and keep everybody on the same playing field. Hosting a project is a very big task that requires a lot of work and organization. If you submit a project entry that doesn’t conform with the project requirements, you’re making more work for the host and for yourself. So read the rules 2 or 3 times before you even begin the project.

Secondly, you need to make sure that you meet the deadline set by the project host. Late entries cause a lot of hassle, especially if the host will be publishing the results of the entire project. Aside from just hitting the deadline, it’s also a good courtesy to submit your entry prior to the final days before the deadline. A lot of people submit entries on the last day or two of the project and it puts a strain on the host. You may run the risk of getting overlooked or having your project get lost in the shuffle. Besides, most of the post-project publications from the host will be in some sort of chronological order — so if you’re an early bird, you’ll get a top spot on the list and your work will be seen by more people.

And the last topic is more of a suggestion than anything. It’s always nice to have project participants post a link to the project requirements with their entry. It allows your audience to be informed about the project and it will give them a chance to participate too. Like I said, it’s a nice thing to do but it’s generally not required by the project host (unless they specify that it is).

The following points are a few methods for self-publication of project entries. Like I said before, each project will require different things of the project entry — some will be completely published by the host, while others will require you to publish something yourself.

PUBLISHING ON YOUR BLOG

It’s my opinion that a blog provides the best avenue for project publication. You have total control over what you publish, how you publish it, and how it looks. The ease of self-publication is downright scary. The project entry can be published as a regular post and it will have its own unique URL that the project host can reach easily.

Even if you have a blog, this may not be the best route for you to use. If your blog topic is very much different than the photography project or even photography in general, you may have reservations for what you publish. If this is the case, read on for some of the free options that may suit you better.

If you don’t have a blog of your own, also check out some of the other methods for publication. What I wouldn’t suggest doing is starting up a blog just to publish the project entry, especially if you have no intent of keeping up with the blog. This will eventually result in broken links and non-existent project entries if you ever decide to delete the one-post blog. But if you’ve been meaning to start up a blog anyways, then I say go for it!

PUBLISHING ON OTHER BLOGS

Oh no, here come the Bloggers
Creative Commons License photo credit: Brett L.

If you don’t have a photography blog that you can publish your project to, that doesn’t mean that you can’t publish on another blog out there. Most bloggers are fairly open to guest posts, and their audience is usually full of other photographers like yourself. If you want to guest post on another blog, make sure it’s one that fits well with the content you’ll be providing. It’s also a good idea to go after a blog that you read and interact with on a regular basis. The blogger will be much more open to your post if you have an existing relationship with them.

There are a ton of photography blogs out there, so don’t limit your sights to the big mainstream sites. Bloggers with smaller or newer sites will generally be more approachable because they’ll be less tied up with running a large website. It also helps if you get your project finished early and have your publication written and ready to go before you approach them.

PUBLISHING ON YOUR WEBSITE

A typical website would be the next best option to the blog. Publishing something like a project entry isn’t quite as easy, but it’s not totally impossible. If you’re accustomed to creating your own web pages, then posting a project entry should be no problem. The nice thing about a standard website approach is that you can post something and have it remain unseen by the rest of your website. Why would you want to do this? If the topic of your website isn’t photography, it might seem a little out of place.

PUBLISHING ON FLICKR

Friday Night Tribute to Flickr! (a.k.a. Things To Do With A Mobile Phone) :)
Creative Commons License photo credit: dsevilla

Flickr is actually very accommodating to publishing a project that requires photos and/or written portions. Obviously, Flickr is built for posting photos, but you can also post text and links with those photos. Add in the ability to tag your photos and create sets, and you’ve got lots of options for publishing a project entry.

If the project requires only a photo, then just post the photo to Flickr as you normally would. Like I said before, it’s also a good idea to write a little about the project (or why you took the photo) and possibly link back to the project page so other people can participate. You can just post this text in the description for the photo, and now you’ve got your own project entry on a single web page.

If the project requires more than one photo (like a portfolio), then a Flickr set is the way to go. Include all your photos in a set, and you can also describe the project in the set description. If the project requires a larger portion of written work, then include that text on one of your photos in the set and link to it from the set description. You want to make sure that the project host can find your entire project entry easily.

If you don’t want to include the project photos in a set (because the free Flickr accounts limit the number of sets you can have), then a common tag will also work. Then you can submit your project entry as the collection of photos with that common tag. To do this, you just add the following text to the end of your photostream URL: “/tags/[tag name]” — here’s an example.

PUBLISHING ON FORUMS

Forums are another great avenue to publish content for free. You can start a new thread, post some project photos, and complete the written part of it all in one spot. Other photographers will then be able to comment on your entry piece, and they’ll also have an opportunity to participate if they choose.

Just like guest posting on another photographer’s blog, posting project entries on a forum will go over much better if you have an existing presence there. Don’t just use the forum as a way to publish the project and never return.

PUBLISHING ON OTHER FREE SITES

Now I’m going to turn the discussion over to you. I’ve presented a few methods of publishing photography project entries, some free and some not. I think it would be useful if some of you offered up some additional suggestions — the cheaper the option, the better.

Stick a Fork In It

In case you haven’t heard, Neil Creek is running a project right now called “Iron Chef Photography – Fork“. The whole idea is to take a photo of a simple object (a fork) and to make it interesting. The project is also a competition, and I’m one of three judges who will be reviewing the project entries. The deadline for the project is March 24th, so you still have a little bit of time to get your entries in to Neil.

The concept of the project is really inspiring — taking a common everyday object and making something interesting of it. As a judge, I can’t participate in the competition portion of the project. I wanted to do my own shot just for the fun of it, but I’m preparing to take a short-notice trip this weekend and I have a ton of things to get in order.

Visit Neil’s Project Update for more Forky Inspiration

So rather than show you my own project entry, I’ll give you guys some extra inspiration from Flickr. Here are a few “forked up” photos from the web. Be inspired.

Broccoli, Fries, and Skies
Creative Commons License photo credit: Stuck in Customs

The Confounded Fork
Creative Commons License photo credit: drp

.bird.
Creative Commons License photo credit: doozzle


Creative Commons License photo credit: steingro

fork_neck_5260
Creative Commons License photo credit: doviende

Fun with Fork
Creative Commons License photo credit: StrudelMonkey

Shadow of fork
Creative Commons License photo credit: spideryan1

66 Faces of Photography

66 Faces of Photography

What a great project this has been! Back in December, Martin and I asked you to participate in a project termed “Shoot Yourself.” We’ve had some great participation and I’ve had the opportunity to see a lot of new faces in this faceless world of the Web.

So here are all of the project entries, organized randomly. Additionally, the randomness will update every few minutes so don’t be surprised if these are out of order the next time you come back! I hope this works in the feed, but if you’re not seeing any photos just come on over to the site. I did this to give everybody that participated an equal chance at getting some exposure. So enjoy! And there’s more discussion below the pics.

BLOGGER FACES

'.$face[0].'‘;
}
?>

PHOTO-SHARING FACES

'.$face[0].'‘;
}
?>

WHY IS THIS SO COOL?

As I mentioned in the project announcement, we tend to hide behind our blogs or our Flickr profiles. We constantly share our photographic works and insights, but many of our onlookers have no idea what we look like. This project was intended to encourage you to open yourself up a bit and become more personal to your fans and friends.

I’m really impressed with the level of creativity displayed here. No two photos are even close to being the same, and some of these had a lot of thought and effort put into them. Most of us may not be portrait photographers, but some of you could fool me into thinking so. You guys did awesome with this one!

A few of the entries were self portraits from the past that met the criteria of the project, but many of these photos were new and they were taken for the purpose of the project. It was great to see the participants passing on word of the project, and we wouldn’t have had half as many entries without the help of those photographers listed above.

As Martin and I cooked up this project idea, our first intent was to connect all the photography bloggers out there. But then we decided to open it up to other photographers using Flickr and other photo-sharing sites. This was a great change of intent, and (as you can see) we had a lot of extra participation from these folks.

SO WHAT’S NEXT?

First, get up there and start checking out these photographers. If you’re looking for some new resources on photography, look through the “Blogger Faces” section. If you’re looking to connect with other photo-sharing photographers, look through the “Photo-Sharing Faces” section.

For those who participated (especially the bloggers), I’ll be sending you the project photos and several versions of the code for the project listing. It’s not required, but you’re welcome to repost some or all of the project entries and share them with your readers. You could show off your favorite captures, your favorite people, or even the entire list if you want.

As for me, I’ll be taking a short break before hosting the next Epic Edits project — and by short, I mean that I’ll be announcing it on January 21st. So stay tuned!