Tag Archives: studio

Link Roundup 09-30-2010

Don’t forget that we have ongoing themes in our Flickr pool and I’ll be selecting my favorites on the topic of “Camera Porn” sometime next week. We only have a few entries in the pool, so be sure to see here for details on participating.

Link Roundup 09-01-2010

Finally starting to clear out my feed reader and catching up on these link posts. I have about 10 or 15 more in the hopper, but I’ll save them for another day.

Link Roundup 05-23-2010

Link Roundup 04-12-2010

Link Roundup 03-31-2010

I’m trying something new with the link roundups, so bear with me while I get it all figured out. This post is testing the Postalicious plugin — it basically taps into my Delicious stream and generates a link roundup based on a set of parameters. I bookmark a lot of stuff anyway, but since separating out my Twitter accounts, I’ve been much more active (and collecting many more bookmarks).

Like I said, I’m still figuring out how I want to do all this. If it goes as I hope, I’ll be sharing fewer links more often with less work.

20 Resources That Will Get You Lit

0233 - Domo Lightbulb
Creative Commons License photo credit: Aaronth

Lighting… It’s a complicated mixture of knowledge, equipment, and magic. You shouldn’t attempt it unless you’re a trained professional with lots of money and a big studio of your own. In addition, you’ll need to memorize thousands of rules and lighting setups in order for your photos to look decent.

Oh wait… forget what I just said. That’s just how it appears before you take the time to learn it.

[tweetmeme]I have to admit that I’m just starting that learning process, and I wanted to share some great resources recently suggested by the readers of Epic Edits. I’ve split up the links into lighting diagrams, lighting tutorials, lighting websites, and lighting courses/workshops. Start clicking!

LIGHTING DIAGRAMS

LIGHTING DIAGRAMS FROM JAKE GARN PHOTOGRAPHY
4 lighting diagrams and sample shots from a fashion photographer.

EXPLAINED LIGHTING SCHEMES FROM FOTOPUNTO.COM
16 simple lighting setups with simple explanations.

SELF PORTRAITS AND LIGHTING DIAGRAMS FROM KRIS MITCHELL
Documentation of a Project 52, including 11 lighting diagrams (and counting).

LIGHTING TUTORIALS

PORTRAIT LIGHTING SET-UPS FROM PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 101
Five of the most basic portrait lighting techniques.

PORTRAIT LIGHTING CHEAT SHEET CARD FROM DIYPHOTOGRAPHY.NET
A great concept that shows a full spectrum of effects by moving a single light.

VISUALIZING STUDIO LIGHTING FROM PHOTOCRITIC
An exploration of simple lighting to achieve different effects on the same subject.

PROPHOTOLIFE YOUTUBE CHANNEL
A collection of 33 video tutorials, mostly having to do with lighting techniques.

SNAPFACTORY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
This playlist titled “Digital Photography 1 on 1″ has great lighting Q&A with examples.

MOMENTOUS BREAKDOWN! FROM YOUR PHOTO TIPS
A good example of the “less is more” motto — check out the photo and diagram!

HOW TO LIGHT ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING – THE DISCERNING PHOTOGRAPHER
An intuitive approach to photographic lighting — start with one!

LIGHTING WEBSITES

STROBIST
Learning how to use off-camera flash with your dSLR.

LIGHTING ESSENTIALS FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
Lighting, Photography, Fashion and Editorial Portraiture on Location and In Studio.

ZARIAS.COM
The blog of editorial photographer Zack Arias

PIXSYLATED
Honestly Biased Insights on Photography by Syl Arena.

PROPHOTORESOURCE.COM
Articles by Chris Grey dealing with lighting techniques and equipment.

STEFAN TELL
Many example photos and lighting diagrams for portraits.

RICHARD AVEDON
Ok… so this one isn’t really a lighting resource, but the photos are awesome to study!

WORKSHOPS AND TRAINING COURSES

THE ONELIGHT WORKSHOP BY ZACK ARIAS
A nuts and bolts type of workshop — Off Camera. Manual Mode. Old School.

LIGHTING ESSENTIALS WORKSHOPS
Learn to light without spending a fortune.

KELBY TRAINING
Online training for photographers — check out the stuff by McNally and Ziser.

[tweetmeme]Special thanks to Nathan Nontell, William Beem, Kris Mitchell, Steve, Shawn, Tomas Webb, Janne, Kunal Daswani, udi, Don Winkler, Mike Blanchard, Stefan Tell, Damien Franco, Jay, and Andrew Boyd for commenting on my previous post asking for lighting resources. You guys are awesome.

Best Studio Lighting Tutorials?

So… it pains me to admit it, but I’ve turned a new page today. I finally learned something about artificial lighting (studio lighting to be exact).

I know… *gasp* say it isn’t so!

But don’t worry, I’m no expert quite yet. All I basically learned was that you set your camera to ISO100, f/8, and 1/200-1/250 seconds, then tune your exposure with the power settings on the lights (at least that’s the “norm” for this particular studio). Maybe not Earth-shattering for those familiar with lighting, but this is all new for me (and maybe some of you).

I’ve got a model shoot coming up next weekend for Green Man T-Shirts and I spent about an hour at DK3 Studios yesterday with Dave King learning how to work his equipment. (Cool dude, by the way. And an awesome/affordable studio here in San Diego).

I’m still blown away by how simple this stuff can be if you switch the camera over to manual and follow a few basic rules… maybe I’ll post more about this after the photo shoot next weekend, but right now I’m looking for advice.

Assuming that the technical side of the equipment is not the issue, I’m still up against lighting techniques for photographing models (upper body shots, portraits, etc.).

SO HERE’S MY QUESTION TO YOU:

What are the best studio/model/portrait lighting techniques that you’ve encountered?

I’m looking for links to articles, resources, ebooks, blogs, etc. Here are a few that I’ve gathered myself…

I’m sure there are many more out there, so feel free to share in the comments. If we get enough, I’ll post them in an article next week so others can check it out.

The Green Man Shoot is Coming Along!

Just wanted to give a quick update on my previous post where I asked you Southern California folks help out with the model shoot I was asked to do for a local San Diego company: Green Man T-Shirts. When I posted it, I was hoping to have a good response, but maybe the “no pay” thing was a turn-off.

I did get one response from a fellow by the name of Michael Walborn and he’s actually a perfect match for this event! Be sure to check out his ModelMayhem profile and his Flickr photos. Not only does he have experience in the studio and photographing models, but he has experience in the same studio that we’ll be using! This is awesome news and I’m really looking forward to learning the ropes with him.

Definitely check out Michael’s stuff — I owe him a big “thank you” for jumping in to help me out with this thing. I also owe Oscar Medina a “thank you” for referring him to my previous post. You see, Oscar is my local San Diego printer and Michael is a fellow customer/contact of his — we both also have photos listed on two of Oscar’s other websites: San Diego Artists and Artist Direct.

THOUGHTS ON WORKING FOR “FREE”

As I said, maybe I didn’t get a huge response on the call for photographers because I was asking people to basically work for free. The word “free” has become a bad word among photographers in recent years, mainly because of the various professional photographers and photography blogs preaching that you shouldn’t give anything away for free as a photographer. If you do, you’re devaluing the marketplace and doing a disservice to yourself and your fellow photographers. While most of these discussions have been aimed at licensing of existing photos (which I generally agree with), the idea of not working for free for any reason whatsoever seems to have attached itself by association. This is a bad outlook to have if you ask me.

I’m not going to preach on this topic of working for free under the right circumstances, mostly because other have made much better arguments than I ever could (see the articles from David Hobby and Chase Jarvis).

DAVID HOBBY: FOUR REASONS TO CONSIDER WORKING FOR FREE

CHASE JARVIS: WILL WORK FOR FREE?

For this Green Man T-Shirt thing, it’s a no-brainer on my part. The company is a local startup, they’re “green”, they donate 25% of their proceeds to charity, they’re enthusiastic, I’m in a position to learn a great deal from this experience, and I need to get out and shoot more often. I have everything to gain from this except for a few dollars (which I wouldn’t be able to charge anyway because of my inexperience). And the only reason I can do this is because Michael has agreed to help out.

I can’t speak for Michael, but I would guess (and this is only a guess) that he’s also interested in gaining more experience, adding to his portfolio, helping out a local company, and having a good time. Whatever his motives, I’m very grateful that he jumped in and offered his time and experience (and I’m going to repay him by providing whatever exposure I can).

So next time you have an opportunity to “work for free” as a photographer, maybe think twice about it before dismissing the idea. In the long run, you just might gain more than you sacrificed. The end of our story with Green Man T-Shirts here in San Diego has yet to play out, but I’m very enthusiastic about what could come of it. I’ll update you guys after our session this March.

What say you? Is working for “free” a bad thing? Would you ever consider doing it yourself? And under what circumstances?

Seeking San Diego Photographer With Studio Experience

I got an interesting email today from (Dave Urban) the co-owner of a company called “Green Man T-Shirts” here in San Diego. He’s renting a local studio and he wants me to photograph a bunch of models wearing their organic t-shirts. Pretty cool! Except for the fact that studios, artificial lights, and posed portraits are all forms of Kryptonite to me.

As much as I would love to do it myself, I simply can’t. But I figure that some of you might want to take the lead instead! I’ll still attend and take a few shots (and maybe learn something about studio equipment), but I can’t be the one running the session and providing the primary images. So here are the basics — if you’re interested, contact me and tell me a little bit about your studio experience.

  • WHEN: March, 2010 [updated... had put 2009 here before]. Date TBD, but it will be a Saturday from 9am to 5pm.
  • WHERE: dk3 Studios in Mira Mesa.
  • BUDGET: Pizza, beer, and loud music. This is not a paid shoot, and the models are also local volunteers.

And here’s more of the details for the shoot.

  • The studio is 1128 square feet and comes equipped with a bunch of monolights, modifiers, backdrops, a 16×16 cyc wall, and a changing room for the models. We’ll have it for 8 hours.
  • 8 models will arrive at 11am and local media (newspaper, TV, etc) will be invited to attend the event between 12pm and 2pm. By 3:30pm, we’ll be wrapping things up and get out of there by 5pm.
  • Photographer will retain copyright of all images taken, and the usage license for Green Man T-Shirts will dictate that credit must be given to the photographer.
  • Dave will also be putting together a video of the event, but I don’t know who will be shooting it. So if there are any cinematographers out there, drop me a line.

Since this is not a paid shoot, I don’t think Dave is expecting a Chase-Jarvis-type to show up and work his magic. But I do think the photographer in charge needs to have a good handle on studio lighting and working with models — you’ll have a bunch of people there relying on you to make it happen.

With the number of models and the size of the studio, I think 2 additional photographers would be a good number. Like I said, I’ll be there to take a few shots, help out with the setups, and grab some “behind the scenes” photos with my trusty rangefinder. So if you think you fit the job and you’re in the general San Diego area (LA folks are welcome too if you want to drive down) contact me and tell me a little bit about your experience.

And here’s how Dave ended his email to me: “I want the shoot to be fun, relaxed, and have a party type atmosphere to it. If things go well, and I see no reason why they shouldn’t, this will be an annual event. Each year I anticipate it would grow, and it could turn into a regular, paying gig for you. But this first year, with so many variables involved and never having done this myself, I’m keeping it on a smaller scale with volunteers and lots of enthusiasm.

Sounds like a good time and a great opportunity to gain a little more experience in the studio. So who’s up for it?

Link Roundup 08-24-2009