Tag Archives: velvia

Darkness Creeps In

Darkness Creeps In

Brian Auer | 06/29/2008 | Huntington Beach, CA | 135mm * f/2.8 * 1/?s * ISO50
[Purchase Prints] [See it at Flickr]

This photo was taken while I was hanging out with a few friends one afternoon at Huntington Beach. It was kind of a last minute “whatcha doin this weekend” sort of thing. Bryan Villarin (F/B/T), Arnold (F/T), Jason Stone (F/B/T), John Watson (F/B/T), my son Rex (F), and I (F/B/T) were all there to grab some shots of the beach and pier while we waited for the sunset to see if anything exciting would happen (you can see them all in this Polaroid I took).

The Guys at Huntington Beach

Just as we were finishing up dinner, the sunset was approaching so we zoomed back over to the beach to grab some shots. I only had film cameras with me that day (4 of them), and I had been shooting black and white with my SLR and TLR. I still had about 10 shots on the roll in the SLR, so I finished that one off and quickly loaded a roll of Velvia 50 with the intent of cross processing. I got about half way through the roll before the sun was gone. If I had decided to swap out the roll in my TLR, I probably would have missed it altogether.

I took the Velvia with me solely for the purpose of shooting the sunset and cross processing it. I assumed that the Velvia 50 would turn out the same as the Velvia 100 when cross processed, so I was expecting to get some serious red/magenta shifts on the already red/orange sunset. Instead, I got a blue/green shift similar to what I’ve seen with Ektachrome. I’m not at all disappointed with the results… it’s just not what I had expected.

And on top of all that, I got this really neat photo that ended up with a heavy vignette/underexposure on the right side of the frame. Very cool results all around. This is one of the reasons I’m attracted to film — sometimes the results are completely unpredictable, but better than you had expected.

POST-PROCESSING

  1. Take exposed film out of camera
  2. Give film to camera store and say “Cross process, please. No prints and no cuts.”
  3. Go outside and take photos for 15 minutes
  4. Go back to the store and pick up film
  5. Take film home and scan
  6. Post photo on the Internet

Yup, seriously… no digital post processing other than maybe some dust removal. Sometimes I also adjust the white balance on my cross processed stuff to remove most of the color cast, but I left this one alone.

What’s Your Favorite Film?

Chroma/luma
Creative Commons License photo credit: piXotroPic

I finally started shooting film — and it’s great! Seeing as how I’ve only shot digital in the past and I’ve been completely ignorant of film photography, I’m now finding myself uneducated about many aspects of film technologies.

One of my biggest unknowns has to do with the actual film — I have no idea which ones I should use or try. I walk into the photography shop and I felt like a kid at a candy store, except I’ve never had candy before. What did I do? I picked up about 10 rolls of different stuff… Ilford Delta, Ilford Pan F Plus, Ilford XP2, Kodak Ektachrome, Fujifilm Velvia, Fujifilm Superia, and a few others.

So in the poll this week, I’d like all you film people to sound off and tell us about your favorite film. I’m sure there are plenty of films I’ve never heard of or seen, and I’d like to have some indication of what is worth trying out. I’ve seeded the poll with a few films, so if you don’t see yours in the list you can add it yourself. I expect the list could get pretty long, so check if yours is in there before you add another.

{democracy:42}

Link Roundup 03-01-2008

Lots of good stuff out there this week folks. I can only display so many links each week, but if you want to see the full list of site’s I’ve bookmarked over the weeks, check out my photography tag on del.icio.us — I have over 700 articles and resources bookmarked just in that category!