Tag Archives: wide angle

7 More Tips for Extremely Wide Angles

[tweetmeme]Just under one year ago, I wrote an article titled “8 Tips for Shooting Extremely Wide Angles“. I wanted to follow up with some additional tips on the subject… and of course, more great photos for your viewing pleasure.

So here are 7 more tips for shooting with extremely wide angle lenses. Some are brand new, and some are an expansion from the previous post. Either way, enjoy!

1. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR FRAMING

20
Creative Commons License photo credit: Maurizio Polese

Extremely wide angle lenses make everything look smaller. This poses a problem when looking through the viewfinder because objects inside the frame can be hard to notice. Chances are, you’ll be paying attention to the overall image and the composition, but these minor details (especially around the edges of the frame) can slip by. What you end up with is a good shot ruined by some small thing down in the corner of the frame. Sure, you can crop it or clone it out, but it’s better to pay attention when you press the shutter.

2. SHOOT A CUSHION SPACE

adelaide slipstream
Creative Commons License photo credit: mugley

Because of distortion, wide angle shots are difficult to get straight. You typically don’t have a perfectly straight line to set your tilt, so you might end up with a slightly crooked shot. This happens more often with this type of lens, so leave a small amount of space around the edge if you’re unsure of your leveling abilities. Even if you shoot straight, you might want to crop down the outer edges just a bit. Distortion increases toward the corners and it can really stretch things out.

3. GET CLOSER

Pout
Creative Commons License photo credit: orangeacid

When shooting extremely wide, you’ll need to get extremely close to your subjects if you want them to be more than a minor detail in the photo. These lenses can usually focus fairly close, so you can get within several feet and focus with no problem. Just be careful that you don’t get too close — appearances in the viewfinder can be deceiving, and you might bump your lens into your subject.

4. STEP BACK

Point The Way
Creative Commons License photo credit: kwerfeldein

Contrary to the last tip, you might want to step back from your subject. This is more well-suited for the landscape photos. Sometimes you have large foreground elements that you want to include in your composition. Just step back a few paces and the whole perspective changes — things up close get significantly smaller, while things way out there don’t change much.

5. ENSURE STRAIGHT LINES

Salton Sea Sunset
Creative Commons License photo credit: Brian Auer

Some wide angle lenses are better than others when it comes to distortion (you can tell by the price tag). But all wide angle lenses share the characteristic of having minimal distortion at the center of the lens. This also works for the horizontal and vertical center-lines of the lens. If you place a horizon at the top or bottom of the frame, it will probably be distorted. But place the horizon at the center of the frame and it should be almost straight. This also works for vertical lines in things like architecture.

6. DISTORT REALITY

184/365 - enjoy coca-cola
Creative Commons License photo credit: B Rosen

Sometimes you want to be a deviant and break “the rules”, right? All you have to do is ignore the last tip. Shoot straight lines near the edge of the frame and you have a whole new reality. You can also get really close to small stuff and shoot against a distant background of big stuff. Or perhaps you could take some portraits at a minimum focus distance and go for the big-nose look.

7. GET CREATIVE AND HAVE FUN

When bovines attack :-)
Creative Commons License photo credit: tricky ™

Super-wide angle lenses are fun to shoot with, but they require a bit of creative thought sometimes. Try out different combinations of subject distance, frame location, perspective, and secondary subjects. You might be surprised at the results every once in a while.

How about some other examples of extremely wide angle photography — drop a photo in the comments below, and leave a tip or two!

Link Roundup 04-10-2010

8 Tips for Shooting Extremely Wide Angles

Wide angle photography can be fun and challenging at the same time. On one hand, it’s great to pull in so much of a scene with a single shot. On the other hand, it can be difficult to produce a well composed photo at such a wide perspective. So I’ve pulled together a few photos and pieces of advice for shooting with wide angle lenses.


For the purpose of this article, we’ll consider anything at or below 30mm (full frame equiv) to be a wide angle.

1. GO VERTICAL

Shooting in a portrait orientation with a wide angle lens can produce wonderful images, even landscapes (which are more commonly shot using landscape orientation). Going vertical allows you to pack a lot of information into the frame, basically from your feet to way up in the sky.

Black's Beach Below, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

Just In Time, by Andreas Manessinger
Photo by Andreas Manessinger
[©]

2. GO HORIZONTAL

Though vertical shots are fun, horizontals will sometimes be better suited for the subject. Evaluate the scene and decide which elements you want to be prominent in the photo.

The Watchman, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

The Place to Be, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

3. EMPHASIZE THE FOREGROUND

Get low or point the camera down to make your foreground the main subject. Since objects in the foreground are much closer than the background, they will appear quite large in comparison. As you get closer to your subject, this emphasis becomes stronger.

Kelp Me, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

The Shell, by Garry
Photo by Garry
[CC by-nc-sa]

4. SHOOT FOR THE SKY

If you have some nice cloud formations, don’t forget to point that lens up at the sky. The wide angle can pull in a huge portion of the sky and make for a great scene.

Wide Open, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

The Barn and the Sky, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

5. PLAY WITH GEOMETRY

Capturing shapes and geometry with wide angles forces you to look at the world a bit differently. Look for large structures containing strong lines or curves, and move around until you find those shapes.

Bridge Over Still Water, by Andreas Manessinger
Photo by Andreas Manessinger
[©]

Hypnosis, by Thomas Hawk
Photo by Thomas Hawk
[CC by-nc]

6. TAKE A PORTRAIT

Wide angle lenses can be used to take portraits, if you’re mindful of the distortions caused by the lens. If you shoot around 30mm (or 20mm for 1.5x crop sensors) and keep your subject near center, the distortion will usually be minimal. On the other hand, you can use very wide angles and get up close to produce a distorted portrait on purpose.

On The Other Side of the Fence, by Brian Auer
Photo by Brian Auer
[CC by-nc-nd]

A cow, by Dave Wild
Photo by Dave Wild
[CC by-nc]

7. TRY A DIFFERENT ANGLE

Wide angle lenses allow you to capture a large scene at very close distances. This means that you can shoot from all sorts of different angles that wouldn’t be possible with normal or telephoto lenses.

Jump out of here! by Stefano Corso
Photo by Stefano Corso
[CC by-nc-nd]

Staircase snail, by Éole Wind
Photo by Éole Wind
[CC by-nc-sa]

8. WATCH THAT DISTORTION

Wide angle lenses are prone to various distortions at extreme focal lengths. You might encounter things like barrel or pincushion distortion, especially at the edges and corners of your frame. If you want to avoid them, keep things like people or buildings away from these areas. But don’t always try to avoid them — use them to your advantage if the subjects are suited for it.

Warp, by Cristian Paul
Photo by Cristian Paul
[CC by-nc-nd]

100: I Need More Sleep, by Josh Hunter
Photo by Josh Hunter
[CC by-nc-nd]

As always, feel free to leave your own tips and/or photos in the comments below. For those of you that shoot wide, what advice do you have for others?

Link Roundup 01-26-2008

  • PROJECT RESULTS: It Ain’t What You Got + Voting
    Neil Creek
    A great result for Neil’s first project — a collection of photos taken with less than optimal cameras. Check out the results and cast your vote for the best photos.
  • 15 unique stairs pictures
    All Day I Dream About Photography
    Great collection of photos all about stairs and staircases!
  • 17 Stunning Wide Angle Images
    digital Photography School
    Many digital photographers get a little obsessed by the ability that their zoom lenses give them to get in nice and close to their subjects. Here are some shots in the other direction.
  • 10 Curious Moments
    Sawse
    10 crazy photos from the history books — old photos (not Photoshopped) of curious moments captured of some curious performers.
  • New Blog: My GPS Camera Phone
    My GPS Camera Phone
    Cool new photography blog that’s all about camera phones! Interesting photos mixed in with some helpful articles… because sometimes, you just gotta put down that dSLR. Thanks for the tip-off Chica!
  • What It Takes to Get Your Photo on the Flickr Explore Page
    Photopreneur
    An examination of what it may take to get your photo featured on Flickr’s Explore page — but it’s still a bit of a mystery since none of us REALLY know the secrets.
  • The DIY Macro Rail
    DIYPhotography.net
    Make your own macro focusing rail with a simple vice and a few DIY mods. No, it’s not overkill.
  • Increase the Dynamic Range of a Single Image
    Paxton Prints
    Outline for a technique to double process a RAW file and merge the two together such that the resulting image has a much higher dynamic range than the original.
  • Video of the Week – Amazing, inspirational, educational, entertaining, captivating, and artistic. Great video about photographer Dan Schwartz on the topic of light graffiti — tips, techniques, AND great sample photos.